ECE _ DSST Organizational Behavior

In large organizations members are also frequently

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grouping of employees into departments creates specialists who develop their own jargon or technical language. In large organizations, members are also frequently widely dispersed geographically, and individuals in each locale will use terms and phrases that are unique to their area. The most significant factor in a successful employee-communications program is the chief executive's leadership. He or she must be philosophically and behaviorally committed to the notion that communicating with employees is essential to the achievement of the organization’s goals. If the organization’s senior executive is committed to communication through his or her words and actions, it trickles down to the rest of the organization. Organizations with effective employee communications aren’t afraid to confront bad news . Organizations with effective employee communications typically have a high bad news to good news ratio. This doesn’t mean these firms have more problems; rather, they don’t penalize the bearer of bad news. All organizations will, at times, have product failures, customer complaints, or other problems. The issue is how comfortable people feel in communicating those problems. When bad news is candidly reported, a climate is created in which people aren’t afraid to be truthful and good news gains increased credibility.
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Different people in the organization have different information needs. What is important to supervisors may not be so to middle managers. Similarly, what is interesting information to someone in product planning may be irrelevant to someone in accounting. Employees vary in the type of information they need and the most effective way for them to receive it. Managers need to recognize this and design their communication program accordingly. Communication should be continual , particularly during periods of change or crisis. When employees need information and it’s not forthcoming, they’ll fall back on informal channels to fill the void, even if those channels provided only unsubstantiated rumors. In those organizations where management strives to keep the information continually flowing, employees are also more forgiving of occasional errors or omissions. Words are the primary means by which people communicate. When we eliminate words from usage because they’re politically incorrect, we reduce our options for conveying messages in the clearest and most accurate form. For the most part, the larger the vocabulary used by a sender and a receiver, the greater the opportunity to transmit messages accurately. By removing certain words from our vocabulary, we make it harder to communicate accurately. When we further replace these words with new terms whose meanings are less well understood, we have reduced the likelihood that our messages will be received as we had intended them. Cross-cultural factors create the potential for increased communication problems. Because words mean different things to different people, barriers can be caused by semantics . Barriers caused by semantics are particularly true for people from different national cultures. Some words don’t translate between cultures. Understanding the word “sisu” will help someone
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