After that the system will be rebooted into your new Ubuntu system 638

After that the system will be rebooted into your new

This preview shows page 86 - 88 out of 155 pages.

After that the system will be rebooted into your new Ubuntu system. 6.3.8. Troubleshooting The components listed in this section are usually not involved in the installation process, but are waiting in the background to help the user in case something goes wrong. 6.3.8.1. Saving the installation logs If the installation is successful, the logfiles created during the installation process will be automatically saved to /var/log/installer/ on your new Ubuntu system. Choosing Save debug logs from the main menu allows you to save the log files to a floppy disk, network, hard disk, or other (removable) media. This can be useful if you encounter fatal problems during the installation and wish to study the logs on another system or attach them to an installation report. 6.3.8.2. Using the Shell and Viewing the Logs There are several methods you can use to get a shell while running an installation. On most systems, and if you are not installing over serial console, the easiest method is to switch to the second virtual console by pressing Left Alt - F2 10 (on a Mac keyboard, Option - F2 ). Use Left Alt - F1 to switch back to the installer itself. 10. That is: press the Alt key on the left-hand side of the space bar and the F2 function key at the same time. 76
Image of page 86
Chapter 6. Using the Ubuntu Installer In case switching consoles is not an option, there is also an Execute a Shell item on the main menu that can be used to start a shell. You can get to the main menu from most dialogs by using the Go Back button one or more times. Alternatively you can also open an additional ssh installer session and execute the Execute a Shell there - see next chapter. Type exit to close the shell and return to the installer. At this point you are booted from the RAM disk, and there is a limited set of Unix utilities available for your use. You can see what programs are available with the command ls /bin /sbin /usr/bin /usr/sbin and by typing help . The shell is a Bourne shell clone called ash and has some nice features like autocompletion and history. To edit and view files, use the text editor nano . Log files for the installation system can be found in the /var/log directory. Note: Although you can do basically anything in a shell that the available commands allow you to do, the option to use a shell is really only there in case something goes wrong and for debugging. Doing things manually from the shell may interfere with the installation process and result in errors or an incomplete installation. In particular, you should always use let the installer activate your swap partition and not do this yourself from a shell. 6.3.9. Installation Over the Network One of the more interesting components is network-console . It allows you to do a large part of the installation over the network via SSH. The use of the network implies you will have to perform the first steps of the installation from the console, at least to the point of setting up the networking. (Although you can automate that part with Section 4.6 .)
Image of page 87
Image of page 88

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 155 pages?

  • Fall '19
  • Debian

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture