In Action Questions 51 Solutions 53 4 LONG PASSAGES 55 In Action Questions 63

In action questions 51 solutions 53 4 long passages

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In Action Questions 51 Solutions 53 4. LONG PASSAGES 55 In Action Questions 63 Solutions 65 5. THE SEVEN STRATEGIES 67 6. QUESTION ANALYSIS 75 7. PASSAGES & PROBLEM SETS 91 In Action Passages & Questions 93 Solutions 107 8. ESSAYS 145 Sample Essays 181 2011 Changes 184 APPENDIX A: VOCAB AND READING COMP 189 APPENDIX B: SNEAK PEEK AUGUST 2011 195
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INTRODUCTION TO PRINCIPLES g READING COMPREHENSION & ESSAYS Chapter 1 of
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In This Chapter . . . • Logistics of Reading Comprehension • Challenges of Reading Comprehension • Two Extremes and a Balanced Approach • Principle #1: Engage with the Passage • Recruiting for Your Working Memory, Inc. • Principle #2: Look for the Simple Story • Principle #3: Link to What You Already Know • Principle #4: Unpack the Beginning • Principle #5: Link to What You Have Just Read • Principle #6: Pay Attention to Signals • Principle #7: Pick up the Pace • Summary of the 7 Principles of Active, Efficient Reading • Practice on Non-GRE Material g
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INTRODUCTION TO PRINCIPLES 13 Manhattan GRE Prep Chapter 1 the new standard * LOGISTICS OF READING COMPREHENSION You are probably already familiar with Reading Comprehension from other standardized tests. You are given a passage to read, and you are asked questions about the substance and structure of the passage. On the GRE, you can almost always expect to see three Reading Comprehension passages. Each passage will typically be accompanied by two to four questions, for a total of eight Reading Comprehension ques- tions. You should be aware of several logistical features of GRE Reading Comprehension passages. Passages are either long or short . Reading Comprehension passages come in two basic forms: LONG and SHORT. Long passages, which consist of about 460 words in three to five paragraphs, take up about 75–85 lines on the computer screen (or 50–65 printed lines in Preparing to Take the GRE General Test, 10 th Edition ). Since only about 25 lines fit the screen, you will have to scroll 3–4 times just to read the passage. Each long passage will have four questions associated with it on the GRE. (Note that long passages printed in Preparing to Take the GRE General Test, 10 th Edition have 7–8 associated questions.) You can expect to see one long passage on your exam. Examples of long passages on the GRE appear on pages 118, and 130 of Preparing to Take the GRE General Test, 10 th Edition. Short passages, which consist of about 160 words in one or two paragraphs, take up about 25–33 lines on the computer screen (or 17–23 printed lines in Preparing to Take the GRE General Test, 10 th Edition ). Usually, you will have to scroll once to reveal the very bottom of a short passage. Each short passage will have two questions associated with it on the GRE. (Note that short passages printed in Preparing to Take the GRE General Test, 10 th Edition have 4 associated questions.) You can expect to see two short passages on your exam. The order of the three passages is typically short–long–short. You may get two passages back to back, without any other type of Verbal question intervening. Examples of short passages on the GRE
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