24 are the results of deregulation similar across the

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Chapter 26 / Exercise 17
Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Technology
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24. Are the results of deregulation similar across the world?
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Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Technology
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Chapter 26 / Exercise 17
Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Technology
Silberstein/Tomczyk
Expert Verified
Demand for Air Transportation 29 2 Demand for Air Transportation The air transport industry is a vital component of the global transportation network. Aviation provides the only means of rapid, long-distance travel which makes it essential for the conduct of global business and tourism. A study produced for the International Air Transport Association, asserts that “By facilitating tourism and trade, it generates economic growth, provides jobs, improves living standards, alleviates poverty and increases revenues from taxes.” (Air Transport Action Group, 2012). This is a bold statement, but these effects are most evident in developing countries. Africa, for examples, has long been plagued by inadequate or non-existent surface transportation which has hindered economic growth, but the recent expansion of airline service provided a springboard for growth after decades of stagnation. By allowing executives, engineers and other critical employees to travel between widely dispersed business locations, aviation supports business operations and efficiency, improves productivity, encourages investment and allows companies to attract high quality employees. Aviation is also essential to tourism which is an important part of many national economies, again often in developing countries. Finally, aviation offers a vital link to communities that lack adequate road and rail infrastructure. This contribution is most apparent when aircraft deliver life-saving supplies in the immediate wake of natural disasters. This chapter begins by examining the global size and scope of the aviation industry and then turns to the factors driving the demand for air transport. Long-range forecasts of air travel demand are essential to commercial aircraft manufacturers whose products are marketed worldwide and have a long service life. The twenty year forecasts developed by the two major commercial aircraft manufacturers, Airbus and Boeing, are examined for factors driving global and regional demand. Airlines are also concerned with macro scale forecasts for long-term strategic planning, but require shorter term and smaller scale forecasts, too, down to the individual city-pair forecasts, for their near-term planning and management. These micro forecasts are addressed in the latter sections of the chapter. Size, Scope and Economic Importance In 2010, the world’s airlines carried over 2.6 billion passengers and 48 million tons of freight.The aviation industry directly employed some 8.4 million people and contributed $539 billion to the world gross domestic product (GDP). For perspective, the industry is larger than the pharmaceuticals ($445 billion), the textiles ($236 billion) or the automotive industries ($484 billion) and is about half the size of the global chemicals ($977 billion) and food and beverage ($1,162 billion) sectors. In comparison with country GDP, aviation’s gross product would rank 19th in the world, or roughly equal to that of Switzerland or Poland.

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