Measuring stroke can be fully dispensed blown out the

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Measuring Stroke can be fully dispensed (“blown-out”) The First Stop is like when you press the Shutter Button on your Camera a bit and it sets the Focus and Exposure. The Second Stop is like when you fully press the Shutter Button and take the Picture. The Eject Button - Most -- but not all -- Microtiter Pipettes have a White Eject Lever on the Back of the Handle - Pressing the Eject Lever -- it takes quite a bit of Force -- ejects the Tip (into the Beaker labeled “Pipette Tips”) Setting the Volume • Set the Volume by turning the knurled Black Volume Adjustment Knob on the Handle (or with newer Microtiter Pipettes, the knurled White Control Knob on Top) Name Top Button Color Volume Accurate Range P200 Yellow 200 μ l 50-200 μ l P1000 Blue 1000 μ l 100-1000 μ l • Don’t use a P200 to measure less than 50 μ l • Don’t use a P1000 to measure less than 100 μ l Always set Higher Volumes first. When changing the Volume from a lower to a higher Setting, turn the Control Button past the Desired Volume and then back again. Most People don ʼ t bother doing this (but you should).
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Lab 2 Page 6 Aspirating • Attach a Pipette Tip Please do not use a Microtiter Pipette without a Pipette Tip • Press the Control Button down to the First Stop (Measuring Stroke) • Immerse the Pipette Tip approximately 3 mm into the Liquid • Slowly release the Control Button • Slide the Tip out of the Liquid along the Inside Wall of the Container Attaching a Pipette Tip can require quite a bit of Force, but too much Force can send the Tip Holder flipping off the Bench. Pretend you ʼ re picking up a Green Olive with a Toothpick and you ʼ ve got the Right Idea. An Air Space at the End of the Pipette Tip indicates Undermeasurement. The actual Volume of Fluid in the Tip can be determined by slowly rotating the Control Knob to expel Air until the Fluid has been pushed to the End of the Tip. You can then read the Volume directly. This Trick can come in awfully handy, say, when you get to the Bottom of that Restriction Endonuclease Tube. Dispensing • Hold the Pipette Tip at an Angle against the Inside Wall of the Container • Press the Control Button slowly to the First Stop (Measuring Stroke). • Wait approximately 1 to 3 Seconds • Press the Control Knob to the Second Stop (Blow-Out Stroke) • Slide the Pipette Tip out along the Inside Wall of the Container • Slowly release the Control Button Ejecting a Tip • Place the Microtiter Pipette over the “Microtiter Pipette Tips” Beaker on your Lab Bench • Slowly but forcefully press the Eject Lever Tips have a tendency to pop off with considerable Force so be sure the Pipette is Positioned (“Aimed”) into the Beaker. • At the End of Lab please empty all Microtiter Pipette Tips in your “Microtiter Pipette Tips” Beaker into the Stainless Steel Pitcher on the Lab Waste Cart.
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Lab 2 Page 7 Lab 2 Exercises The Bacterial Growth Curve Materials (per Clan) • Flask of Nutrient Broth Growth Medium (50 ml) at 37°C • Flask of Logarithmic Phase E. coli (for the entire Lab) • Spectrophotometer
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