His remarks are then logically irrelevant to the

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  His remarks are then logically irrelevant to the point at issue, for the question concerns the particular measure at hand-that on housing legislation and  not  on the nature of houses to be built.   Presumably everyone agrees that decent housing for all the people is desirable (even for those who  will pretend to agree but do not really think so). The question is: will this particular measure provide  it, and if so, will it provide it better than any practical alternative? The speaker’s argument is  fallacious, for it commits the  fallacy of irrelevant conclusion.  
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An argument commits this fallacy if its premises are directed towards a conclusion different from the  one that is supposed to be established by them 10. Fallacy of Complex Question It is obvious that there is something “funny” about questions like “have you given up your evil ways?” or “have you stopped beating your wife?” these are not simple questions to which a straightforward  “yes” or “no” answer is appropriate. Such questions presuppose that a definitive answer has already  been given to a prior question that was not even asked. This is a  complex question.   Complex questions are not confined to obvious jokes like those above. In cross-examination a  lawyer may ask complex questions of a witness to confuse or even to incriminate him. He may  ask,  “Where did you hide the evidence? Or why did you steal from him?”  or the like. In such cases the intelligent procedure is to treat the complex question not as a simple one, but to  analyse it into its component parts. Other kinds of complex questions -  a mother may ask her  youngster if he wants to be a good boy and go to bed.  There are two questions involved; one does  not presuppose a particular answer to the other. What is wrong here is the suggestion that one and  the same answer must be given to both of the questions; and this is the folly, a  fallacy of complex  question  has been committed 11. Fallacy of Converse accident (hasty generalization) In seeking to understand and characterize all cases of certain kind, one can usually pay attention to  only some of them. But those examined should be typical rather than atypical. If one considers only  exceptional cases and hastily generalises to a rule that fits them alone, the  fallacy of converse  accident  is committed.
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