Personal area network pan 245 305 bluetooth devices

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devices like wireless headphones, speakers, wireless keyboards and mice, smart watches, printers, game controllers and the list goes on and on. Personal Area Network (PAN) 2:45-3:05 Bluetooth devices communicate using what's called a personal area network or PAN. Which is similar to an ad hoc wireless network. However, with a PAN, you have a single device called the master device that all other devices, called slaves, connect to. Slaves communicate through the master deviceand set up directly with each other. Near Field Communication 3:06-4:46 The last short range wireless communication method we're going to talk about is called near field communication or NFC. NFC used the 13.56 megahertz frequency and has a very short range. In order for devices to communicate they have to be within two inches of each other. NFC capable devices use very small chips called NFC chips that are able to send and receiveinformation using radio signals. These chips are able to also store small amounts of data. Because of this, NFC is being used in a lot of different applications. For example, most countries now use NFC chips in their passports. The NFC chip contains all of the information about the passport holder and can be scanned by special passport machines at the airport. NFC is also being used by credit card companies. An NFC chip that contains all of the credit card information is embedded into the card. Which can then be simply tapped on to an NFC reader to pay for things. Some smart phones are NFC enabled and can be used to pay for things, establish connections with other phones, used as a ticket for transportation, the possibilities are really endless. When sending sensitive information, such as credit card information, NFC is able to use encryption algorithms to secure the connection. NFC does have some limitations. It's not nearly as fast as other forms of wireless communication. In addition, things like credit cards and passports are constantly emitting their NFC signal. This means it's possible for someone who is close enough to steal the card information. To protect against this, it's possible to store credit cards or passports in NFC shielded sleeves. Summary 4:47-5:08 Okay, so that's it for this lesson. In this lesson, we looked at the different short range wireless communication technologies used by devices. We first looked at infrared and the two differentcommunication modes, LOS mode and diffuse mode. Then we looked at Bluetooth and how it creates a personal area network. And we finished by looking at near field communication and the various ways it can be implemented. Configuring Bluetooth Connections 0:00-0:11
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In this demonstration, we're going to practice working with Bluetooth connections between devices and this Windows system that I'm working with here that I want to connect a smartphone to. Enable Bluetooth on a PC 0:12-1:32 Now in order to do this I have to have a Bluetooth adapter installed and configured in the system and I've done that, I've connected a USB Bluetooth adapter to the system and I've also loaded the drivers necessary to support that device. However, if we come down here to the Notification area we can see the Bluetooth icon right here which indicates that Windows has recognized the device and it has the drivers necessary to support it. But
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  • Spring '14
  • Computer network, Local area network, Network topology, Metropolitan area network

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