Advanced aircraft avionics and dve 4 dve dve can be

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ADVANCED AIRCRAFT AVIONICS AND DVE4DVEDVE can be divided into two categories; first is the aircraft disturbing the natural environment it’s operating in- such as dust and snow (Kennard, 2008). These two environments are usually only a factor when the aircraft is conducting take off and landings. The first category is a major issue for military rotary wing aircraft conducting combat operations in a desert or snowy environment. The second category is created naturally by the environment or by man. Themost common DVE conditions created by the environment are darkness and precipitation effects (fog, mist, clouds, heavy rain, and heavy snow). However, man creates battlefield smoke and citylights (Kennard, 2008). The military uses night vision goggles (NVGs) to counter the darkness. The general aviation (GA) industry is slowly acquiring NVGs to provide safer night operations for pilots. All other DVE conditions, pilots must be trained and educated on how to deal with “mother nature”. The military has limited avionics components that will aid the pilot in addressing either DVE category. DVE conditions mentioned can cause pilots to become disoriented during flight. According to Lt. Col Higginbotham, the Aviation Directorate for the U.S. Army Combat Readiness/Safety Center defines DVE as “reduced visibility of potentially varying degree, wherein situational awareness and aircraft control cannot be maintained as comprehensively as innormal visual meteorological conditions, potentially leading to loss” (Higginbotham, 2014). Lt. Col Higginbotham notes that spatial disorientation (SD) and DVE are linked. He continues by describing SD as “what happens” to the pilot and DVE is the condition “where it happens”, which results in the loss of orientation (Higginbotham, 2014). If you have never encountered DVE as a pilot, it’s a very unnerving event.
ADVANCED AIRCRAFT AVIONICS AND DVE5Spatial DisorientationSpatial orientation is being able to maintain your body’s orientation and posture with the surrounding environment (physical space), no matter if you’re static or in motion (Antunao, n.d.). Spatial disorientation is when you cannot determine your position, attitude, and motion about the Earth’s surface. When a pilot encounters SD in flight, they’re usually unable to trust their instrumentation. They instead rely on false information provided by their senses (Department of the Army, 2009). A pilot encountering DVE unexpectedly will become overwhelmed, and their workload increased dramatically. Approximately 20 percent of all major Army aviation accidents valued over half million dollars have been caused by SD, or loss of situational awareness in DVE (Higginbotham, 2014). Spatial disorientation accounts for five to ten percent of all general aviation accidents, which 90 percent of those are fatal. (Antunao, n.d.).

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