Methods 38 participants with dsm iv bipolar disorder

This preview shows page 150 - 153 out of 327 pages.

Methods 38 participants with DSM-IV bipolar disorder in full or partial remission for at least 4 weeks were recruited to a 10 session PE intervention. 19 participants were allocated to the intervention and 19 after a waiting list control using a quasi-randomised design. Participants completed self-rating scales to measure illness and medication attitudes and beliefs before and at the end of the intervention; mood symptoms, compliance and functioning were also assessed and followed up for a 12 month period with assessments at 6 and 12 months post intervention Aims a. Improvements in unhealthy personal beliefs and attitudes related to an adapted group PE intervention will be maintained overtime (a 12 month follow up period). b. People who subsequently relapse over the year following the intervention when compared to those who do not relapse, will have less improvement in their unhealthy personal beliefs about illness and attitudes towards medication from PE. Results The intervention resulted in significant improvement in attitudes, beliefs, symptoms and functioning which were maintained over a 12 month follow up period. Nine people relapsed in the 12 months after the intervention compared with 22 before (p<0.002). Relapsers improved significantly less than non-relapsers following psychoeducation on the PBIQ (p=0.012) and the DAI (p=0.046).
151 Conclusion Improvements in unhealthy personal beliefs about illness and dysfunctional attitudes are maintained over a 12 month follow up period. The number of relapses were reduced after a group PE intervention and were associated with greater change in attitudes towards illness and medication.
152 Introduction The use of psychoeducation (PE) as an adjunctive treatment to medication has been identified as having benefits which range from improving symptoms and relapse (Miklowitz et al., 2000; Colom et al., 2003; Castle et al., 2010; Lobban et al., 2010; Schaub et al., 2013) through to increased ability to function (Lobban, Taylor et al., 2010; Schaub, 2013). Content of PE interventions has been linked to positive outcomes across multiple health domains in previous reviews (Rouget and Aubry, 2007). Longer term effects of psychoeducation are less established with follow up reported at less than 6 months (Peet and Harvey, 1991; Dogan and Sabanciogullari, 2003; Eker and Harkin, 2012), most studies planning follow up between 6 and 12 months (Castle et al., 2010; Lobban et al., 2011; Satjatovic et al., 2009; Barnes et al., 2011; Miklowitz et al., 2007) and more limited data available from follow up carried out at twelve months and beyond (Perry et al., 1999; Colom et al., 2009; D’Souza et al., 2010; Parikh et al., 2012; Schaub, 2013). The effect of PE on relapse is demonstrated to be different in manic and depressive episodes. PE is clearly effective in reducing manic relapse (Castle et al., 2010; Zaretsky et al., 2008) with efficacy in depressive episodes still questionable. How well the effects of PE are maintained over time in either phase of BPD is not clear with the most recent review identifying that effects of medication

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture