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D an infants first solid foods complementary foods

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D. An Infant’s First Solid FoodsComplementary foodscan be introduced into the diet as infants becomes physicallyready to handle them.When to Introduce Solid FoodThe AAP supports exclusive breastfeeding for 6 months but recognizes that infantsare often ready to accept some solid foods between 4 and 6 months of age.The exact timing depends on the infant’s needs, readiness, and tolerance to the food,as shown in Table 13–13.How to Introduce First FoodsCaregivers must therefore understand how infants signal hunger and satiety (seeTable 13–13) and how to respond to these signals appropriately—a process known asresponsive feeding.When a caregiver clearly and consistently responds to a child’s needs at mealtimes,the child learns to identify internal hunger, thirst, and satiety signals; to ask for foodor beverages when hungry or thirsty; and to stop eating when full.Foods to Provide Iron, Zinc, and Vitamin CIn addition to breast milk or iron-fortified formula, infants can receive iron fromiron-fortified cereals and, once they readily accept solid foods, from protein foodssuch as meat, poultry, seafood, eggs, and legumes (see Figure 13–12).Infant cereals are not routinely fortified with zinc, so again, the best sources areprotein foods such as meats, poultry, seafood, eggs, and legumes.The best sources of vitamin C are fruit and vegetables (see Snapshot 7–5, p. 240).
Fruit juice is a source of vitamin C, but too much juice can cause diarrhea in youngchildren.Developing Physical Readiness for Solid FoodsThe ability to swallow food develops at around 4 to 6 months, and food offered byspoon helps to develop swallowing ability.At 8 months to a year, a baby can sit up, can handle finger foods, and begins toteethe.oAt that time, hard crackers and other finger foods may be introduced topromote the development of manual dexterity and control of the jaw muscles.oThese feedings must take place under the watchful eye of an adult becausebabies cannot safely chew and swallow them without choking.Preventing Food AllergiesTo prevent allergies or identify them promptly, experts recommend introducing eachnew food singly in a small portion and waiting three to five days before introducingthe next new food.Choice of Infant FoodsCommercial baby foods in the United States offer a wide variety of palatable,nutritious foods in a safe and convenient form.Parents or caregivers should not feed directly from the jar; spoon the needed portioninto a dish to prevent contamination of the leftovers that will be stored in the jar.Adults can season their own food after taking out the baby’s portion.Foods to OmitSweets of any kind (including baby food “desserts”) have no place in a baby’s diet.Salty canned vegetables are inappropriate for babies, but unsalted varieties provide aconvenient source of well-cooked vegetables.

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Term
Spring
Professor
JanGoodwin
Tags
Diabetes, Childhood obesity

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