Merchants called hong merchants who had been licensed

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Merchants called Hong merchants who had been licensed by the Chinese Government for that purpose, the Emperor of China agrees to abolish that practice in future at all Ports where British Merchants may reside, and to permit them to carry on their mercantile transactions with whatever persons they please” (Columbia University Asia for Educators, n.d.). This portion of the treaty alone demonstrates how China was mistreated and forced to allow foreign traders in her country to trade how they see fit. Much can be learned from the Opium Wars. Where there is a will, there is a way. Despite the outright despise of Opium by the emperor, he was not able to stop the destruction it was causing to China or break the hold that Britain had obtained on China through the Opium drug trade. Even with the drug being prohibited, people still found a way to get it and it was still smuggled into the country because people were benefiting from the sale of it. This concept could be applied to today’s world. You can outlaw things and prohibit them all day long, but people will still find a way to get access to something they really want. When this happens it leads to other issues such as corruption and sometimes even war.
5ReferencesColumbia University Asia for Educators. (n.d.). Excerpts from the Treaty of Nanjing, August 1842. Retrieved from MIT Visualizing Cultures. (2011). The first Opium War: The Anglo-Chinese War of 1839-1842. Retrieved from Watts, P. (2013, June 2). Field of dreams: A remarkable exhibition sheds new light on the dark history of the opium business. The Independent. Retrieved from

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