These building traditions ceased with the emergence of a new architectural

These building traditions ceased with the emergence

This preview shows page 13 - 18 out of 18 pages.

evolved in sequence and have overlapped from the beginning of the fifteenth century. These building traditions ceased with the emergence of a new architectural movement which was brought into the country in the twentieth century after the nation's independence. This new phase was the development of modern architecture and during this period, many buildings in Malaysian cities were built in the International Style, which was popular in many western countries. Sultan Abdul Samad Building The Sultan Abdul Samad Building (Malay: Bangunan Sultan Abdul Samad; Jawi: ننو ڠڠاب دمصلادبڠ ناطلس ) is a late-nineteenth-century building located along with Jalan Raja in front of the Dataran Merdeka (Independence Square) and the Royal Selangor Club in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The building originally housed the offices of the British colonial administration and was known simply as Government Offices in its early years.
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Thean Hou Temple Another must-visit religious building in KL is Thean Hou Temple, one of the oldest and largest temples in Southeast Asia. Situated along Jalan Klang Lama Road, the six-tiered Buddhist temple is also known as the Temple of the Goddess of Heaven and commemorates Tian Hou, a goddess said to protect fishermen as well as Guan Yin, the Goddess of Mercy. Built in 1894, Thean Hou Temple features contemporary architectural styles and traditional designs with intricate embellishments, ornate carvings, and hand- painted murals. This iconic temple also houses a Chinese medicinal herb garden, tortoise pond, well, and a sacred Bodhi tree.
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Sri KandaswamyKovil Hindu Temple Sri KondaswamyKovil Hindu Temple is a colourful shrine in Brickfields, Little India. Dedicated to the Hindu deity Lord Muruga, the temple hosts a pavilion and lotus pond with several peacocks wandering through the main courtyard. As one of the most orthodox Hindu temples in Malaysia, photography is strictly prohibited inside temple grounds. However, visitors can take stunning shots of its ornate entrance gate which devotees believe to be the threshold between the material and spiritual world. Well- regarded as Sri Kondaswamy Kovil Hindu Temple’s most impressive feature, the ‘gopuram’ (entrance gate) is embellished with intricate carvings of hundreds of Hindu deity statues.
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Sin Sze Si Ya Temple Sin Sze Si Ya Temple, built in 1864 by Kapitan Yap Ah Loy, is hailed as the oldest Taoist temple in Kuala Lumpur. Situated just a three-minute walk away from Petaling Street, the temple also functions as a cultural centre for the city’s Chinese community and is usually filled with devotees during significant occasions such as Chinese New Year. Sin Sze Ya Temple is dedicated to patron deities Sin Sze Ya and Si Sze Ya, who played significant roles in Yap Ah Loy's ascension to Kapitan status during the 19th century.
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