7 another instructional strategy is questioning

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Another instructional strategy is questioning. Asking questions gives students a purpose for reading, helps them focus on what they are learning, encourages comprehension monitoring as well as helps students draw upon their schema to relate to the content. There are a multitude ofquestion types which teachers might ask their students. right there questions, think and search questions, author and you questions, and on your own questions (Rob, 2019). These four types ofquestions need to be explicitly asked based off of the needs of the specific literacy learner. A transitional literacy leaner might need more “right there” or “think and search” questions while intermediate literacy learners might need a variety to help them receive those “Low ceiling-high floor” activities (Rob, 2019). While your advanced literacy learner needs a vast variety of question types to truly see if they are comprehending the text appropriately. My literacy learner Alex, is currently an intermediate literacy learner. He has some struggles in the areas of vocabulary acquisition as well as comprehension. His struggles are related to his delays with decoding and basic phonemic awareness skills. For this student I have used many basic instructional strategies to help start the basics of vocabulary acquisition and comprehension. Based off of the assessments and discussions with him, I know that he has struggled with his literacy skills for quite some time. Most of his teachers have used a traditional literacy model (the workshop model) to teach reading. Based off what needs Alex has, I believe he would have benefited from a structured literacy model (Spear-Swerling, 2019). The more that Alex could have been interacting in a small group and using vocabulary, language and incorporating his skills I believe that his skills would be stronger than they are now. Through our discussions and assessments, I have seen that he had little to no comprehension strategies in his tool belt. He struggled to find ways to help him comprehend basic fourth grade texts. 8
The strategy that I have used and is helpful for fourth through sixth grade students is using a think-aloud. During the think aloud the teacher vocalizes his/her thoughts to his/her students on how comprehension of a specific text is occurring. After the teacher models, studentswill then transfer their new knowledge to an independent text on their own. This is when the teacher will monitor students to see if they have transferred the knowledge gained from his/her modeling. Think alouds have proven to be effective for reader who struggle with comprehension.Think alouds allow students to become aware of their own comprehension process. This awareness can allow them to become independent readers. This strategy is one that I have specifically used with my transitional literacy learner, Alex. Since he has struggles with comprehension, this instructional strategy is best for him. We have done many model and transfer lessons in which I model thinking-aloud through a text and after, allow him to do it with

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