many believed this signified that he was a traitor o Declaration of Pillnitz

Many believed this signified that he was a traitor o

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many believed this signified that he was a traitor o Declaration of Pillnitz Under pressure from French émigrés, Emperor Leopold II of Austria, who was the brother of Marie Antionette, and King Frederick William II of Prussia issued this ultimatum. The two monarchs vowed to intervene in France to protect the royal family and to preserve the monarchy. Section Five: The End of the Monarchy—A Second Revolution Section Overview o Major challenges for the Assembly Resistance to the Civil Constitution of the Clergy How to deal with the king’s flight What to do about the Declaration of Pillnitz Emergence of the Jacobins o Who were the Jacobins? a club of like-minded men that emerged out of the National Assembly they established networks throughout the provinces o What were the political views of the Jacobins? they wanted a republic rather than a constitutional monarchy held the ideologies of the most radical thinkers of the Enlightenment, and, particularly the views of Rousseau who emphasized equality, popular sovereignty, and civic virtue o Girondists were a subgroup of the Jacobins and assumed leadership in the Assembly they led the Assembly to declare war on Austria they believed the war was necessary for the revolution to survive o War with Austria War radicalized politics in France and led to the overthrow of the constitutional monarchy and established a republic—this is commonly known as the Second Revolution A group of women led by Pauline Leon petitioned the National Assembly for the right to bear arms and the right to fight to protect the revolution Some women enlisted and served in the army during the war with Austria.
Brunswick Manifesto The duke of Brunswick, commander of the Prussian military, issued a declaration threatening to burn Paris to the ground if the royal family was harmed. This ignited further suspicions against the king. The “commune” formed in Paris in order to protect the gains of the revolution from both internal and external threats. August 10, 1792 Crowds swarmed the Tuileries Palace and forced Louis XVI and Marie Antionete to take refuge in the Legislative Assembly. The crowd fought with the royal Swiss guard. Royal family was from here out imprisoned—in comfortable quarters—but the king was not permitted to perform any political functions The Convention and the Role of the Sans-Culottes o The September Massacres In September 1792, the Parisian crowd again rose to action by summarily executing about 1,200 people who were in the city jails. The prisoners included some clergymen and aristocrats, but most were common criminals who the crown assumed were counterrevolutionaries.

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