perception of her weight if she overestimates her weight that could be a sign

Perception of her weight if she overestimates her

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perception of her weight, if she overestimates her weight that could be a sign of eating disorders and can also lead to other risky behaviors [Mar14]. Additional Information Needed I would need to assess the nutritional status of the patient and the family, availability of food, and perception of weight. Being able to calculate the body mass index (BMI) would be the best tool to assess nutritional status and total body fat (Ball, et al., 2015). To calculate the BMI, one would obtain the patients weight and height then the formula is weight divided by height
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equals BMI (Ball, et al., 2015). If this number is under 18.5 the patient is undernutrition (Ball, et al., 2015). Three Targeted Questions Based on the evidence presented above, I would ask these questions of these parents/caregivers, to gather more information, considering their potential sensitivities. 1. How do you describe your weight? [CDC17]. This question will allow the practitioner to see how the patient perceives herself and her weight. 2. Are your grandparents very slim as well? [Rus17]. This question will allow the practitioner to verify that this may be a genetic quality and may not need treatment [Rus17].
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