Relative to the h h 2 standard the ag ag reduction

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Relative to the H + / H 2 standard, the Ag + / Ag reduction reaction has a potential of Ag / Ag,reduction E . V + = + 0 0 80 . Correct the measured half-cell potentials for the difference in standards and enter the results in the third column of Table 2.
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Chemistry 132 Lab Manual Page 48 Part A2. Complex Ion Formation of Cu(NH 3 ) 4 2+ . In Parts A2, A3, and A4 we will measure the dependence of cell potential on the concentrations of electrolytic solutions. 1. Set up a Cu(s) | Cu 2+ (aq) || Ag + | Ag(s) electrochemical cell (shown below). 2. Dispense 10 mL of 0.050 M AgNO 3 solution into a 60 mm x 35 mm crystallizing dish and tape a silver electrode to the side of the crystallizing dish. 3. Pipet 5.00 mL of 0.050 M Cu(NO 3 ) 2 solution into a crucible with agar. You will use this volume in your calculations. Add the 0.050 M Cu(NO 3 ) 2 solution to the crucible before placing the crucible in the crystallizing dish. Be sure you do not trap large air bubbles under the crucible. 4. Measure the cell potential and record the value in your notebook as “Potential E cell (before addition of 1.0 M NH 3 )” 5. Use the dispenser containing 1.0 M NH 3 to transfer 10 mL into a clean 50 mL beaker. 6. Use a Pipettor to transfer 1.00 mL of 1.0 M NH 3 from the beaker to the crucible. Mix the solution carefully with a clean stirring rod. Record in your notebook any changes you observe in the Cu(NO 3 ) 2 solution. 7. Record in your lab notebook the cell potential, after it becomes steady, as “Potential E 0 cell (after addition of 1.00 mL 1.0 M NH 3 ) ” 8. Repeat steps 6 and 7 seven more times, giving a total of 8.00 mL of ammonia added to the crucible.
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Chemistry 132 Lab Manual Page 49 Part A3 . Experimental Procedure for formation of the Ag(NH 3 ) 2 + complex anion. 1. Set up a Cu(s) | Cu 2+ (aq) || Ag + | Ag(s) electrochemical cell as follows. 2. Dispense approximately 10 mL of 0.050 M Cu(NO 3 ) 2 solution into a 60 mm x 35 mm crystallizing dish and tape the copper electrode to the side of the crystallizing dish. 3. Dispense approximately 10 mL of 0.050 M AgNO 3 solution into a clean 50 mL beaker. Use a Pipettor to transfer 5.00 mL of 0.050 M AgNO 3 solution into a crucible with agar before placing the crucible in the crystallizing dish. Record the volume. You will use the volume of 0.050 M AgNO 3 in your calculations. You must, of course, place a Ag(s) electrode into the AgNO 3 solution in the crucible when measuring the cell potential for Part A3 experiments. 4. Measure the cell potential and record the value in your notebook as “Potential E cell (before addition of 1.0 M NH 3 ).” 5. Use the dispenser containing 1.0 M NH 3 to transfer 10 mL into a clean 50 mL beaker. 6. Use a Pipettor to transfer 1.00 mL of 1.0 M NH 3 from the beaker to the crucible. Mix the solution carefully with a stirring rod. Record in your notebook any changes you observe. 7. Record in your lab notebook the cell potential, after it becomes steady, as “Potential E 0 cell (after addition of 1.00 mL 1.0 M NH 3 )”.
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