Blaser M 2013 Antibiotic overuse stop the killing of beneficial bacteria Nature

Blaser m 2013 antibiotic overuse stop the killing of

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Blaser, M. (2013). Antibiotic overuse: stop the killing of beneficial bacteria. Nature , 476 (7361), 393-394. Llor, C., & Bjerrum, L. (2014). Antimicrobial resistance: risk associated with antibiotic overuse & initiatives to reduce the problem. Therapeutic advances in drug safety , 5 (6), 229-241. Show Less Jenica Hughes 7/26/2016 9:28:12 PM Discussion Part One Dr. Duncan & class, My first course of action would be to arrange a meeting with the physician in the practice. I would inform him of Stephanie's actions & he must act in accordance with the law. An office examination is needed to assess the patient's symptoms & records of all prescriptions are required to be documented in the patient's medical record (Buppert, 2011). This situation is very concerning for several reasons. First of all, Stephanie is a medical assistant. She essentially, took on the role of a nurse practitioner &/or physician by prescribing the Amoxicillin for Mrs. Smith. Secondly, she used my name as the prescriber. I never examined this patient in the office & I did not prescribe this antibiotic for this patient, but with my name on the medication label as the prescriber, this places me in a tough spot if Mrs. Smith were to have any negative outcomes related to taking this antibiotic. Each year in the United States, more than 20,000 deaths occur as a result of antibiotic-resistant infections caused by the misuse/overuse of antibiotics (Onieal, 2014). If Mrs. Smith had made an appointment with me for an office visit for a simple cough/upper respiratory infection, I would not prescribe antibiotics at all. A simple cough should resolve itself over several days by using over the counter medications based on my 23 years of nursing
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experience. I also know based on nursing experience that there are several reasons that Mrs. Smith could have a cough. Does she have pneumonia? Is her cough related to her blood pressure medication? Is she having a COPD exacerbation? Does she have the flu? Does she have undiagnosed lung cancer? This is a very touchy subject for me considering that my mother-in-law did see her primary physician & was prescribed an antibiotic for her cough. A month later, she decided to go to the ER for the same cough. She was diagnosed with lung cancer. Considering all factors, Stephanie does not have prescriptive authority working as a medical assistant. She has clearly overstepped her scope of practice. Jenica References Buppert,C. (2011). Nurse practitioner's business practice & legal guide (4th ed.). Sudbury, MA: Jones & Bartlett. Onieal, M. (2014). But i'm sick? Where's my script? Clinical Reviews, 24 (9), 8-10. Show Less Marsha Wiersteiner 7/26/2016 9:40:22 PM Discussion part 1 Dr. Duncan & Class: This would be a difficult situation to not jump to conclusions. With the information at h&, it sounds like Stephanie took it upon herself to call in a prescription for the pati Show More Jill Coles
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7/26/2016 10:29:42 PM Discussion Part One Dr. Duncan & Class, Nurse practitioners are under obligation to report ethical misconduct according to the American Nurses Association Code of Ethics. Provision 2 of the Code of Ethics states that the nurse’s primary commitment is to the patient; provision 3 states that the nurse will protect the safety of
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