individual becomes disoriented confused and loses the ability to concentrate

Individual becomes disoriented confused and loses the

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individual becomes disoriented, confused and loses the ability to concentrate (Huether & McCance, 2017). The mental status changes induce behavioral changes, including irritability, agitation and restlessness. Weight loss can be significant. Mood changes or state of mind also result from deterioration in cognition. Motor changes may occur if the posterior frontal lobes are affected, which will cause rigidity and flexion posturing (Huether & McCance, 2017).
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Alzheimer in normal aging Research has indicated that more than 45% of non-demented elderly would meet NIA-RI criteria for AD had the elderly people demented. Also, the regional distribution patterns of the pathological changes in the non-demented controls the matches for Alzheimer disease patients. Therefore, AD is a continuous spectrum of dementia and asymptomatic lesions (Hammer & McPhee, 2014). The apparent dissociation between cognitive status and AD pathology among the elderly because of the referred to as “individuals with an asymptomatic AD” seem resilient to the neurotoxin of the effects of amyloid plaques. The clear understanding of morphological and biochemical substrates of the cognitive decline to resilience in the presence of Alzheimer disease pathology may be essential to demystify new therapeutic targets for the ailment. AD pathology resilience has been related to nuclear and cell hypertrophy of the cortical and hippocampal neurons suggesting metabolic activation to face the effects of neurotoxicity of AD lesions (Hammer & McPhee, 2014).
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Patient Factors: Gender, Age and Genetics The primary risk factor of AD is old age (Murray, 2012).The risk of developing AD for the elderly can be partially assessed based on the ApoE genotype. There are also
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  • Spring '15
  • McPhee, Alzheimer disease pathology

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