Perception of thought is also a perpetualtruly an inescapableactivity of the

Perception of thought is also a perpetualtruly an

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Perception of thought is also a perpetual–truly an inescapable–activity of the purusha. It isonly reasonable then to conclude that to discover the true self or to cause the self to becomeestablished in its real nature we must employ the faculty of thought. Yet it is thought that istangling us up all the time in false identities. So it is not just thought in general that we need,but a special kind of thought–one that turns the awareness back upon itself and eventuallymerges itself into the pure consciousness that is spirit. That unique thought is Om. “Its japaand meditation is the way.” Our eternal nature ensures our success.The “genealogy” of soundThe cosmos and the individual are manifested by the same process: ever-expanding sound-vibration, Spanda. First there comes the most subtle expansion-movement or vibration on thecausal level where rather than an objective sound it is a bhava, the slightest differentiation ofprimal consciousness. This is known as dhvani. Dhvani then expands and mutates into nada,which is sound, but in such a subtle form that it is more an ideaof sound rather than actualsound. Nada develops into nirodhika, a kind of focussing of the energy so it becomes potentialsound. This expands and becomes ardha-indu (ardhendu), the “half-moon” which is the crescentshape seen on the Om symbol and on the head of Shiva. This is both thought and sound, butsound that can only be heard as the faintest of inner mental sounds. Ardhendu then expandsand becomes bindu, the vibratory source-point that is depicted in the Om symbol as a point ordot.The bindu is composed of three parts or aspects: nada, bindu, and bija (seed). Nada ispredominantly consciousness, and corresponds to Shiva or God the Father. Bindu ispredominantly energy, and corresponds to Parvati or God the Holy Spirit, the Mother. Bija is93both consciousness and energy, and corresponds to Ganesha, or God the Son. According to
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the yoga scriptures there are three basic forms of sound or speech: 1) pashyanti, that whichcan only be intuited or felt rather than heard–even within; 2) madhyama, that which can beheard in the mind as thought; and 3) vaikhari, that which is physically spoken and heardoutwardly by the ear through the vibration of the air. But beyond even these is the transcendentalsound, para-vakor “supreme speech” which is soundless sound, consciousness itself.This bindu is fully sound, but on the interior level only. It cannot be spoken aloud. Itcannot be spoken at all, but only perceived and entered into as the first step back to thesource consciousness that is Spirit. Yet, from bindu comes all the permutations that are thevarious sounds which are combined to form words–including mantras. As we enter intorelative consciousness through the expansion of sound, just so can we enter back intotranscendent Consciousness through the intentional contraction of sound that occurs inmeditation.
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