9 Get over yourself and start giving yourself 10 Find the benefit in every bad

9 get over yourself and start giving yourself 10 find

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9. Get over yourself and start giving yourself. 10. Find the benefit in every bad experience. 11. If at first you do succeed, try something harder.
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12 Make Failure Your Best Friend The things which hurt, instruct. —BENJAMIN FRANKLIN T he idea that you can make failure your best friend may seem odd to you. But the truth of the matter is that failure is either your friend or your enemy—and you are the one who chooses which it is. If you play a dirge every time you fail, then failure will remain your enemy. But if you determine to learn from your failures, then you actually benefit from them—and that makes failure your friend. If you repeatedly use your failures as springboards to success, then failure can become your best friend. Let me show you what I mean. EMBRACING TRAGEDY How would you feel about an incident that cost you your nose, half your right arm, and all the fingers on your left hand? I’m guessing that you wouldn’t have positive feelings. But that’s what happened to Dr. Beck Weathers, and he sees that loss as the defining event in his life—the event that turned everything around for him. “Would I like to have my hands back?” he said in an interview on CBS Evening News. “Sure. Would I like to have my hands back enough to go back to who I was? No.” What event would cause a man to willingly embrace such a drastic disability? The answer can be found on Mount Everest. You see, Beck Weathers was one of the people on that peak during the now-famous incident in 1996 when a blizzard cost twelve people their lives. NO ORDINARY MOUNTAIN TOP EXPERIENCE Weathers was forty-nine years old when he ascended Everest. At that point, he had been a mountain climber for ten years. And it consumed him. He acknowledges, I regret the time taken away from my family, from my wife and two children. There’s a large dose of selfishness involved in such an activity … I realize I was defining myself by climbing and not dealing with the rest of my life. It’s an excessive goal, and it never ends. You get about one day of happiness, and then you’re planning your next trip. 1 Weathers always spent a lot of time in preparation for his next trip. Before Everest, he had scaled six of the seven summits, the highest mountains on the continents. And for each climb he underwent a grueling training regimen. For the Everest climb, Weathers signed on with an expedition led by New Zealander Rob Hall. Before the team got to the high camp (at twenty-six thousand feet), Weathers was doing fine, despite the difficult conditions—bitter cold and one-third of the oxygen present at sea level. But as he ascended the peak on May 10, Weathers realized he was in trouble. Some years before, he had undergone radial keratotomy surgery to correct his vision. As he went up the mountain, the altitude caused the lenses in his eyes to flatten
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out, and that made him blind.
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