7 mobilization the act of assembling and making both

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7. Mobilization The act of assembling and making both troops and supplies ready for war. The word mobilization was first used, in a military context, in order to describe the preparation of the Prussian army during the 1850s and 1860s. Mobilization theories and techniques have continuously changed from then till today. Notably, before World War I and World War II, several countries developed intricate plans to achieve a fast and effective mobilization in case of war. 8. Schlieffen Plan
Attack plan by Germans, proposed by Schlieffen, lightning quick attack against France. Proposed to go through Belgium then attack France, Belgium resisted, other countries took up their aid, long fight, used trench warfare. 9. Lusitania The Lusitania was a British passenger ship that was sunk by a German U-Boat on May 7, 1915. 128 Americans died. The unrestricted submarine warfare caused the U.S. to enter World War I against the Germans. 10. Russian Revolution (1917) WWI was a catalyst for the Russian Revolution, in which the tensions of Russian society exploded. By February 1917, Tsar Nicholas II had lost all support and was forced to abdicate from the throne. This event led to massive social upheaval, and non-Russian nationalists seeking greater autonomy or even independence from Russia. This social revolution demonstrated the inadequacy of the Provisional Government, which came to power after the fall of the Romanov dynasty, and opened the door to radical socialists such as the Bolsheviks. 11. Treaty of Brest-Litovsk The Treaty of Brest-Litovsk was a peace treaty signed on March 3, 1918, at Brest-Litovsk (now Brest, Belarus) between the Russian SFSR and the Central Powers, marking Russia's exit from World War I. 12. White Russians Opposed the communist revolution in Russia; Became involved in a civil war with the Red Russians who supported the revolution; the White Russians lost the civil war 13. Reds (or Red Russians) Fought under the organizational direction of Leon Trotsky (1879-1940). Eventually suppressed internal and foreign opposition to the new government. 14. Fourteen Points
It was an 8 January 1918 statement by United States President Woodrow Wilson that the Great War was being fought for a moral cause and for postwar peace in Europe. Europeans generally welcomed Wilson's intervention, but his main Allied colleagues (Georges Clemenceau of France, David Lloyd George of the Great Britain, and Vittorio Emanuele Orlando of Italy) were skeptical of the applicability of Wilsonian idealism. 15. , Big Four at 1919 Paris Peace Conference Refers to the top Allied leaders who met at the Paris Peace Conference in January 1919, in Europe, following the end of World War I. It was called the Big Four/Big Three because the three major leaders were Woodrow Wilson (United States), David Lloyd George (Britain), and Georges Clemenceau (France); However, Vittorio Orlando (Italy) was also involved but remain more on the sidelines, making it the Big Four.

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