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Retrieved April 03, 2018, from - family-farm-science/ Weinand, D. (2018). Energy from Waste: Anaerobic Manure Digestion. Retrieved April 03, 2018, from
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Hi Emily McCormick, You had a lot of really interesting data in your post and I loved it. I really enjoy reading posts that can give concrete numbers to show a point they are trying to make. It really shows that greenhouses gases, as well as particulate matter, from the agricultural sector are a real problem that we all must start addressing. I also agree with you that regulations should be enacted by our government to help reduce these emissions. However, I disagree that legislation on emission limits will have as much of an impact as you might think. A study done in 2012 showed that the average life of a farm tractor is 22 years (Muñoz & Llanos, 2012). This means that even if you enacted legislation today you would still have tractors that were sold yesterday emitting the high levels of pollution for the next 22 years. While I think that idea would be a good step I think it would also be helpful to offer benefits for farms that used methods such as no-till farming, agroforestry, solar powered drip irrigation systems, or intercropping through the next farm bill for a more immediate impact. Maybe an idea along the lines of for percent of land they use one of these practices on then they are eligible for benefits .1% higher than they would have been otherwise. This means that a farm that used these strategies through their entire farm would be eligible to receive 10% more benefits compared to a farm that did not use these techniques at all. This would give farmers an incentive to change their techniques immediately, but it would also give them the flexibility to slowly institute them so that they could learn the best methods while not destroying their business. The thing that I have found most interesting about all of these articles is that we use all of these devices and machines to increase our crop yields. However, if we don’t find a way to farm without the use of them, or at least without them polluting the air, then our crop yields are going to be reduced around 10%, during a time that we will need to increase food production by around 50%, due to the increase in population size (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2014). (Courtesy of National Geographic).
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(Courtesy of World Population Prospects) Something that is really interesting, and a bit scary, is that the areas that where the population is going to increase the most are also the areas where the populations are going to be the highest. If something does not change it would not be hard to imagine some of these high populations starting to invade other, more fertile lands to be able to feed the populations that they already have. Hopefully we, as a planet, can find a way to fight climate change along with the slowing the increasing world population.
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