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Earlier the non significant union recognition

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earlier, the non-significant union recognition coefficient might suggest that they help resolve some ofthose problems.[TABLE 4]Next we establish the relationship between workers’ perceptions of poor working conditions and theirdesire for union representation in WERS. We do so using models that contain workplace fixed effects sothat the comparison is between workers in the same workplace. The dependent variable is constructedusing responses to following question: ‘ideally who do you think would best represent you in dealing withmanagers here about the following issues…getting increases in my pay; if I wanted to make a complaintabout working here; if a manager wanted to discipline me?’Pre-coded responses are: myself, tradeunion, another employee, somebody else.The worker scores each time she responds ‘trade union’, thusgiving a maximum score of 3 and a minimum score of zero.Controlling for individual and jobcharacteristics workers who perceive a higher number of poor working conditions are significantly morelikely to desire union representation,even among like workers in the same workplace(Table 4).Theeffect is apparent among union members (column 2) but is stronger for non-members (column 3).1211Specialists are designated according to their job title.12The model for non-members is perhaps of most interest given unions’ objective of reaching out to new members. The modelaccounts for roughly one-quarter of the variance in the desire for union representation among non-members.Desire for unionrepresentation rises with age initially but then tails off; it is greater among non-white ethnic minorities, those with higherqualifications, and those in lower occupations.It falls with tenure and wages.
13In BWRPS there is no question asked of members and non-members that captures worker desire for unionrepresentation, but non-members in non-unionized workplaces were asked how likely they would be tojoin a union if one was formed that they could join.The number of poor working conditions had apositive independent effect on the likelihood of joining having accounted for demographic, job andworkplace characteristics.Linear estimation of the probability of being ‘very likely’ to join revealed thateach additional poor working condition corresponded to a 2.5 percent increase in the likelihood ofjoining.13The value of using a scale capturing the number of poor working conditions over and above jobdissatisfaction is most simply illustrated by looking at effects of poor working conditions separately fromthe four dissatisfaction dummies that make up part of the poor conditions scale.First we reran the modelsin Table 4 replacing the poor working conditions variable with a (0,4) count variable for dissatisfactionson four job aspects and dummy variables for the other nine poor working conditions.The number ofdissatisfactions was positive and statistically significant in the all employees model and for non-members,but it was not significant for members.

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Term
Fall
Professor
NoProfessor
Tags
Trade union, union representation, A Theory of Human Motivation,

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