One way to deal with this problem is by deadlifting like an Olympic

One way to deal with this problem is by deadlifting

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One way to deal with this problem is by deadlifting like an Olympic weightlifter— with the shoulder blades pinched and the chest out. It works—if you are content with not reaching your deadlift strength potential. Partially protracted scapulae—and a chest that is not inflated—shorten the dis- tance one has to pull and thus increase the amount one can stand up with. Besides, once the weight gets heavy enough, you shall assume this posture—whether you like it or not. So you might as well practice the way you are going to play from the very beginning. It is a decidedly bad idea to have different techniques for light and heavy weights. Masters like Andy Bolton understand this. Several years ago I watched him pull 900+ at the Arnold Classic. I also saw Andy warming up with 135 and his tech- nique was identical to that of the big pull. “Act like your light lifts are heavy, so your heavy lifts will feel light,” an axiom powerlifting great Ernie Frantz nailed a couple of decades ago. But what about the pain in the weakened mid-back?—There is neither pain, nor weakness, thanks to a generous helping of rows, in Bolton’s methodology. Not only do the rows round up the back development for deadlifts, they help the bench press go up and the shoulders stay healthy. More on this later. Push your shoulders down away from the ears—an “antishrug”. If you pay attention, you will get a cramp in your armpits. And your waist will feel more stable. Keep sitting back while keeping your weight over the center of your feet or slightly towards your heels. At the point where your “long” arms have reached the bell you are looking at a spot on the ground 6-10 feet in front of you. Grip the kettlebell handle, then try to “break” it to increase your lat activation. “Break” it from your armpits, not just from your hands. When you find your lats, your deadlifts will feel stronger and safer.
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Push your shoulders down away from the ears—an “antishrug”.
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23 Stand up ramrod straight. Don’t think about lifting the kettlebell but focus on your feet, visualize stomping them through the ground. Take a breath and sit back again. Do not think about putting the bell down as this intention is likely to get your back in trouble. Instead, focus on sit- ting back and use your lats to guide the kettebell into the precise spot between your feet. Keep “breaking” the handle. When the kettlebell has brushed the ground, stand up. Inhale on the way down and exhale on the way up. Repeat for a couple of sets of five. Stand up ramrod straight.
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24 The ascent Visualize a jump with your knees and hips straightening out simultaneously. Your butt should never—ever!—rise faster than your shoulders when you do any kind of a deadlift. It is important to drive this crucial point home early on. When the weights get heavy, it will be very tempting to lead the lift with your tail. Here is why your body makes such a poor decision.
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