When performing a subjective evaluation an observer should enter the space in

When performing a subjective evaluation an observer

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When performing a subjective evaluation, an observer should enter the space in the manner of a normal visitor and should render a judgment of acceptability within 15 seconds.
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ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2016 31 Each observer should make the evaluation independently of other observers and without influence from a panel leader. Users of subjective evaluation methods are cautioned that they only test odor and sensory responses. Some harmful con- taminants will not be detected by such tests. Carbon monox- ide and radon are two examples of odorless contaminants that pose significant health risks. To evaluate the acceptability of adapted persons (occupants), an observer should spend at least six minutes in the space before rendering a judgment of acceptability C-29 . REFERENCES C-1. ACGIH. 2005. Threshold Limit Values for Chemical Substances and Physical Agents and Biological Exposure Indices. American Conference of Govern- mental Industrial Hygienists, 1330 Kemper Meadow Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45240-1634. . C-2. Maximum Concentrations at the Workplace and Biolog- ical Tolerance Values for Working Materials 2000, Commission for the Investigation of Health Hazards of Chemical Compounds in the Work Area, Federal Republic of Germany. C-3. Martin, W., and A.C. Stern. 1974. The World’s Air Quality Standards, Vol. II. The Air Quality Manage- ment Standards of the United States, Table 17, pp. 11–38. October 1974 (available from NTIS PB-241- 876; National Technical Information Service, 4285 Port Royal Road, Springfield, VA 22161). C-4. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. 2008. Code of Federal Regulations , Title 40, Part 50. National Ambient Air Quality Standards. criteria.html. C-5. U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Safety and Health Administration. Code of Federal Regulations , Title 29, Part 1910.1000-1910.1450. . C-6. U.S. Food and Drug Administration. 2004. Code of Federal Regulations , Title 21, Part 801.415 (maxi- mum acceptable levels of ozone), April 1. - access. gov/cfr/index.htm/. C-7. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. 1992. A Citi- zen’s Guide to Radon and Technical Support Docu- ment for the Citizen’s Guide to Radon. C-8. Health Canada . 1995. Exposure Guidelines for Residen- tial Indoor Air Quality: A Report of the Federal-Pro- vincial Advisory Committee on Environmental and Occupational Health. Ottawa: Health Canada. - 156.pdf. C-9. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. 1990. Compen- dium of Methods for Determination of Air Pollutants in Indoor Air. Document No. PB 90-200-288/AS, available from NTIS, Springfield, VA 22161. C-10.American Society of Testing and Materials. Annual Book of ASTM Standards, Section 11, Vol. 11.03 Atmospheric Analysis; Occupational Health and Safety. ASTM, West Conshohocken, PA. C-11.World Health Organization. 2000. Air Quality Guide- lines for Europe, 2nd Edition. World Health Organi- zation Regional Publications, European Series No.
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