During waking consciousness signals from the pons bombard the cortex

During waking consciousness signals from the pons

This preview shows page 15 - 18 out of 29 pages.

During waking consciousness:  signals from the pons  bombard the cortex.  Association areas of the cortex  interpret those signals as seeing, hearing, etc. Those signals come from the real world and result in an  experience of reality. During sleep:  the signals from the brain stem are random  and the brain must somehow interpret these random  signals.  It puts together an explanation of the cortex’s  activation from memories and other stored information. In this theory, called  activation-synthesis hypothesis,  a dream is merely another kind of thinking that occurs  during sleep.  It is less realistic.  It comes not from the  world of reality but from within people’s memories and  experiences of the past. The frontal lobes- normally used in daytime thinking, are  shut down during dreaming.  This may account for the  unrealistic and bizarre nature of dreams. *There are experts who suggest that dreams have more  meaning.  A survey questioning subjects about their  dream content concluded that much of the content of  dreams is meaningful, consistent over time, and fits in with past or present emotional concerns.
Image of page 15
Hobson and colleagues have reworked the activation- synthesis hypothesis to reflect concerns about dream  meaning calling it the  activation-information-mode  model or AIM.   This newer version says that information that is accessed  during waking hours can have an influence on the  synthesis of dreams.   It states that when the brain is “making up” a dream, it  uses experiences from the previous day or last few days,  instead of using “random” items from memory. What Do People Dream About? Calvin Hall  collected over 10,000 dreams.  Most reflect  the events that occur in everyday life.   Most people dream in color.  People who grew up with  black-and-white television sometimes have dreams in  black and white. Dr. William Domhoff   published his book “Finding  Meaning in Dreams” (1966).   Conclusions:  across many cultures:  men dream more  about other males, women dream more about males and  females equally.  Men have more physical aggression in  dreams.  Women are more often victims in their own  dreams.   Girls and women dream more about people they know,  personal appearance, issues related to family and home. 
Image of page 16
Boys and men dream more about male characters in their  dreams which are usually in outdoor or unfamiliar settings  and may involve weapons, tools, cars, and roads.
Image of page 17
Image of page 18

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 29 pages?

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture