Seismology earthquakes determine the earthquakes

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Seismology (earthquakes) − Determine the earthquakes’ epicenter depth: ∙ Is the epicenter shallow? Intermediate? Deep? More than one depth? ∙ Do you see any patterns? Volcanology − Look at the geographic distribution of volcanoes, as well as their relation to plate boundaries. − Note that some volcanic chains occur on continents, some on oceanic islands, and some in ocean basins. − Are the volcanoes oriented parallel or perpendicular to adjacent plates? Geography − Note areas of high elevation vs. low elevation. − Which are higher elevation, continental land masses or oceanic basins? Be sure to use the scale. Geochronology (geologic ages) − What do the colors represent on this map? − What is the age distribution of oceanic crust? − Relative to the continents, where is the oldest oceanic crust? What is the relationship between oceanic crust age and boundary type? ∙ If there is no correlation between age and boundary type, be sure to state “no correlation.” Tip : A black and white copy of each map is included at the end of this lab. Be sure to review each map and the above hints for the final exam.
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Lab 1: Plate Tectonics 13 Activity 3: Reassemble Tectonics Research Groups 1. Discuss the findings from each locality. Go to the appropriate specialty map during the discussion. Determine how each specialty data can help distinguish between different types of plate boundaries based on the patterns observed. Step 1: Complete the chart on pg. 14 in pencil with your group members’ observations. Step 2: Come up with a hypothesis about the appropriate plate boundary type for each group of boundaries based on you observations and discussion. Fill in the boundary type names (divergent, transform or convergent) in the appropriate blanks on your chart. Step 3: Go to the Plate Boundary Map on pg. 15, use the appropriate symbols to show relative motions along the five plate boundaries listed on the chart (it is not necessary to label all the plate boundaries on the map).
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Lab 1: Plate Tectonics 14 Step 1: Analyze the data from your location from each map (complete using specialty hint on pg. 12, then teach your group members about your location when you regroup) Step 2: LOCATIONS GEOGRAPHY Data: elevation in meters VOLCANOLOGY Data: volcanoes above water SEISMOLOGY Data: Earthquake hypocenters GEOCHRONOLOGY Data: Rock ages in Millions of years What type of plate boundary is this? Associated geographic features (trench, mountain chain, island chain) and their locations Are volcanoes present in each of the boundaries? Where? Describe. Is there a pattern to earthquake locations? Depth? Describe. Are there patterns to the relative ages of crust? Describe. Oceanic-Continental (example: west coast of S. Am.) Deep ocean (trench) on plate boundary, high mountains on continent inland of plate boundary Volcanoes form a north- south chain east of the plate boundary + a few scattered on oceanic plate EQ’s go from shallow depth on west edge of SA plate, get deeper further inland (to east) Youngest sea floor on west
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