SOLUTION FOCUSED THERAPY APPLICATION A CASE STUDY replace it with and when Ana

Solution focused therapy application a case study

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SOLUTION-FOCUSED THERAPY APPLICATION: A CASE STUDY replace it with and when Ana speaks negatively about her time between sessions, emphasizing any known positives and allowing both the therapist and Ana to be right (The Centre for Solution Focused Practice, 2016). Ana’s therapist would remain future-focused as the two of them work together using the interventions mentioned previously (Murdock, 2017). Traditional solution- focused therapists might temporarily leave the room towards the end of Ana’s session to write a personal message to Ana with compliments and homework relevant to the solutions they had determined in their sessions (Winbolt, 2011). In the opening of later sessions, the therapist would likely not ask about homework, but rely on Ana to bring it up so there is no sense of failure if she has not completed the homework (Hanton, 2011). Future sessions would also include more use of the techniques that worked and would not include techniques that did not work. Furthermore, the counselor would encourage Ana to continue the solution-focused strategies outside of the session and to discard the proposed solutions that did not create change (Murdock, 2017). The length of Ana’s treatment would be brief, as solution-focused therapy’s alternative name, brief therapy indicates. It could be anywhere from one to ten sessions (Murdock, 2017). In solution- focused therapy, because the client determines what is healthy for her, Ana would be the one to determine when therapy is over, rather than the therapist (de Shazer, 1991). Social and Cultural Needs of the Client Admi. They believe in the power of language to create and define reality and therefore that there are no absolute truths (de Shazer, 1994). personality traits, attitudes, motivations), McKergow and Korman (2009) wrote, “Solution-focused therapists do not make assumptions about any of the above and they do not try to change them” (p. 39). Likewise, structures or processes external to the individual, such as systems, power structures, and cultural norms, are not important to individual change. McKergow and Korman (2009) opined, “This is not to say that, for example, cultural norms have no influence . . . However, this is not the same as acting as if there were an overarching ‘real system’ or ‘power structure’ that must be found, mapped, followed, or changed, or else the work will be in vain” (p. 41; quotes in original). The therapist focuses on the text (what the client says needs to be different) without making any further assumptions (de Shazer, 1994). 5
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SOLUTION-FOCUSED THERAPY APPLICATION: A CASE STUDY Client and counselor negotiate the nature and mean-ing of the client’s complaint (Guterman, 2013). For example, a client would be asked, “What do you mean by ‘depressed’?” or more likely, “What is it like when you are not depressed?” Adopt-ing the client’s lingo, so to speak, is a way the SF therapist enters the client’s world and joins with him in constructing the therapeutic relationship. Constructivist Philosophy Ch.
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