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Emotional responses such as nervous perspiration also

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Emotional responses such as “nervous perspiration” also involve hypothalamusInfundibulum: extends from the floor of hypothalamus to the pituitary glandPlays an important role in secretion of hormones from the pituitary
Mammillary bodies: form visible swellings on the posterior portion of the hypothalamus and are involved in emotion responses to odors and memoryCerebrumThe largest part of the brainLongitudinal fissure: divides the left and right hemispheresGyri: folds which increase the surface area of the cortexSulci: grooves that increase the surface areaEach cerebral hemisphere is divided into 4 lobesoFrontal lobe: voluntary motor functions, motivation, aggression, mood and smell perceptionoParietal lobe: principle center for receiving and consciously perceiving most sensory informationoOccipital lobe: receiving and perceiving visual inputoTemporal lobe: olfactory, auditory sensations and plays a role in memory. Associated with abstract thought and judgmentsCentral Sulcus: separates the frontal and parietal lobesLateral fissure: separates temporal love from the rest of the cerebrumoInsula: deep within the fissure/often called fifth lovePart IV: Sensory FunctionsAscending TractsTransmit information via action potentials from the periphery to various parts of the brainEach tract is involved with a limited type of sensory inputoSuch as pain, temperature, touch or positionEach tract contains axons from specific sensory receptors specialized to detect a certain kind of stimulusUsually given composite names that indicate their origin and terminationUsually begin with the prefix spino-indicating they begin in the spinal cordMost ascending tracts consist of two or three neurons in sequenceSpinothalamic tract: transmits action potentials dealing with pain and temperature to the thalamus and onto the cerebral cortexDorsal column: transmits action potentials dealing with touch, position and pressureSensory tracts typically cross from one side of the body to the other in the spinal cord and brainstemoLeft side of the brain receives sensory input from the right side and vice versaTerminate in either the brainstem or cerebellumSensory Areas of the Cerebral CortexPrimary sensory areas: sensations are perceivedPrimary somatic sensory cortex: thalamic neurons relay sensory information hereoSensory fibers from specific parts of the body project to specific regions of the primary somatic sensory cortex so that a topographic map of the body exists in this part of the cerebral cortexAssociation areas: cortical areas immediately adjacent to the PSSCoInvolved in the process of recognition
Part V: Motor FunctionsVoluntary movements result from stimulation of upper and lower motor neuronsUpper motor neurons: have cell bodies in the cerebral cortex and axons form descending tract that connect to the lower motor neurons

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Term
Fall
Professor
RyanDill
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