In some cases the elderly lives in poverty andor

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physical and mental relaxation and wellness. In some cases, the elderly lives in poverty and/or rural and do not have access to resources to activities such as yoga or tai chi groups. In terms of socioeconomic status, the majority of minority elderly have more disadvantages than White elderly; approximately 33% of African American elderly live in poverty, and nearly one-half of them live at or below the poverty level in rural areas with more than half of African American elderly in poor health and experience higher rates of multiple chronic illnesses than the rest of the population (Yoon & Lee, 2004). In situations where elderly PUBLISHED
minorities has limited access to resources, they lean on their spiritual beliefs and practices in support of their mental, physical, and functional well-being. The use of spirituality in an intervention should be totally guided by the patient and their requests. I have experienced situations in which I was hospitalized and the doctor and a nurse on different occasions asked my permission to pray over me. I accepted what they asked allowing them to say a prayer for me. The client’s wishes should always be respected honoring them with their requests. In the field of social work, we will encounter different situations that we do not agree with one hundred percent but our own feelings have to be placed aside to provide the client with what they need. Clients who have specific beliefs and practices should be allowed to own it and carry with and within them whatever makes them feel better. Monod, S. M., Rochat, E., Büla, C. J., Jobin, G., Martin, E., & Spencer, B. (2010). The spiritual distress assessment tool: An instrument to assess spiritual distress in hospitalised elderly persons. BMC Geriatrics, 10 , 88 . Retrieved from the Walden Library databases. Yoon, D. P., & Lee, E. O. (2004). Religiousness/spirituality and subjective well-being among rural elderly Whites, African Americans, and Native Americans. Journal of Human Behavior in the Social Environment, 10 (1), 191-211. Retrieved from Walden Library databases. Hi Rhonda, No one wants to go. We would all like to stay, but this is that part of the life span cycle where it comes to an end. As human beings, we like to think that it is not that important, so we place it on the back burner, knowing that one day it is my turn. So, how do we get the client to understand that life is at or coming to an end? First, we remove our biases from what we think the client should accept and accept way of dealing with his or her end of life cycle. However, if at all possible, if we could get the client to tell their life story, it would help.

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