In the fall of 2007 we conducted 15 interviews 20

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In the fall of 2007, we conducted 15 interviews 20 with youths at 10 different YFP sites. Two of the 15 youths were no longer involved in the program. Youths had been involved with the program from three weeks to three years; 10 had been involved for over one year. Most, even those involved in the program for at least a year, expected to be involved in the program either “as long as [I] can” or at least another year. About 75% of youths still enrolled in the program currently had mentors. Most of those with mentors had been matched with their mentor for about a month. All of the youths have or had young adult mentors. Youths found out about YFP through school (n=9), their mother (n=5), or a sibling or friend already enrolled (n=3). Sport activities, Family Night Out, going to movies, and games were the most commonly reported program activities (see Table 14). All youths reported multiple activities. None of the youths reported 4-H as a program activity. Table 14. YFP Activities Reported by Youths Activity Number of times reported Sports 10 Family Night Out 7 Movies 5 Games/playing 4 Homework/ reading and math 2 Arts and crafts 2 Dancing 2 Cooking and baking 2 Going to an amusement park 2 Other 9 20 All but one were in-person interviews. The remaining interview was conducted over the phone. 57
YFP/4-H Mentoring Evaluation Sport activities were also the most common activity that youths indicated they engaged in with their mentor. Participation in program activities ranged from three times a week to once a month. When asked specifically about how often they met with their mentor, the most common response was once a week. Most youths reported that family members, particularly siblings, were involved in the program. In fact, about 40% had siblings enrolled in the program. About half (n=4) of the youths responding to the question “what do you think YFP is supposed to help you with?” indicated that YFP is supposed to help them with schoolwork. When asked how their mentor helps them, schoolwork (n=6) followed by being a positive influence (n=2) were the most common responses provided by youths. Only one youth reported that his/her mentor did not help him/her. Though a number of youths did not respond, the responses provided generally fit with the discussion in the Program Guide regarding how YFP is supposed help youths. Table 15. Youth Perceptions of Types of Help Provided by YFP Type of Help Number of times reported School/homework 4 Other 4 Have fun/entertainment 2 Don’t know 2 No response 6 Most youths reported that they liked YFP or that it was “good” (93%) and that they liked their mentor (80%). A few youths also indicated that they felt the program helped them, was fun, and gave them things to do. Youths reported that they liked their mentor because he/she was fun, nice, helped them or was similar to them. When asked to describe their relationship 58
YFP/4-H Mentoring Evaluation with their mentor, most reported that they felt comfortable with their mentor and just over one- third indicated that they felt safe with their mentor.

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