2 Having a general superiority complex based on special skills or talents

2 having a general superiority complex based on

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2. Having a general superiority complex based on special skills or talents (acquired or inherited) whichis rewarded by deference and can be at least imitated.Sources of Social StratificationOccupation: Occupations are not equal. Some attract more wealth/pay, power and status. Forexample doctors, engineers and lawyers get a lot of money. Thus they can become wealthy and gainhigher social status.Education:people have different access to education. Those that get high quality education at alonger period of time of time are likely to occupy better occupations than those without that kind ofeducation.Wealth:Those with wealth or high income can purchase education and health services forthemselves and their children. This can give them a higher social status.Personal attributes:Some people have achievement motives than others. Those with achievementmotives will tend to go into business and excel. This will make them move higher the ladder of socialstatus.Ascribe status (Family status):Some people have advantage over others simply because frombirth, they are defined for certain positions. In other words, these people do not have to work to attain
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status or certain positions. Identities that flow from religion, gender, race or position of birth may bethe basis of ascribed status.Lifestyle:Lifestyle refers to where one stays, the clothes put on, the schools children go to, the typeof vehicle driven, the estate where one stays e.t.c.ADD NOTES ON FEATURES ON SOCIAL STRATUM- TOPIC SIX: NATION AND NATIONALISM
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The word “nation” is derived from a Latin word “nation” which denotes the idea of common birth ordescent. A nation can therefore be said to be a large grouping of people bound together by a commonhistorical origin, the same ancestors, common experiences, language and cultural practices. Anderson argues that a nation is an imagined political community. It is imagined as both limited andsovereign.iIt is imagined because most members of even a small Nation never meet one another or hear oneanother, yet they feel they belong to that particular one community.iiIt is limited in the sense that nations include some people who are regarded as belonging, whileexcluding others as outsiders. No nation claims to include the whole community.iIt is sovereign because nationalism seeks or celebrates independence and self government for agroup of people David McCrone in the Sociology of Nationalism (1998) has given the following information aboutNationalism. In distinguishing nation from state, McCrone points out that nation and state are oftenseen as one and the same as in the term nation- state but this is not always the case. The state isessentially a political and administrative unit but people may feel a sense of national identity whichdoes not coincide with political boundaries.
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