Line Encoding Line encoding transforms binary information bits into a digital

Line encoding line encoding transforms binary

This preview shows page 220 - 237 out of 473 pages.

Line Encoding Line encoding transforms binary information (bits) into a digital signal suitable for transmission through the channel Examples: NRZ-I, Manchester, MLT-3, Bipolar-AMI-RZ 220
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Block Encoding Block encoding maps m-bit data blocks into n-bit code blocks (where n>m) to ease clock recovery, remove DC bias, and control code messaging Each n-bit block is then line coded Examples: 4B/5B, 8B/10B, 64B/66B Question: How much overhead (in percent) does 4B/5B insert? 221
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Categories of Standard Ethernet Figure 13.8 10Base-T is still fairly commonly deployed Page 222
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Ethernet Cable Types Straight-through Ethernet copper cable Terminations at both ends are identical Crossover Ethernet copper cable Terminations locations of transmit and receiver wires on one end of cable are reversed Applications Auto-MDIX connections generally supported on modern Network interfaces Auto-MDIX automatically detects the required cable connection type and configures the connection appropriately, removing the need for crossover cables to interconnect switches or connecting PCs 223
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Ethernet Cable Types networking examples 224
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100Mbps Fast Ethernet Implementations 225 100Base-T is the most commonly deployed LAN PHY
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100BaseTX Line and Block Encoding 226 MLT-3 line encoding
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100Base-FX Line and Block Encoding 227 NRZ-I line encoding
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Gigabit Ethernet Implementations 228
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1000Base-X Line and Block Encoding 229
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1000Base-T Line and Block Encoding 4D-PAM: four dimensional pulse amplitude modulation 230
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10GBase-S/L/E (10GE) Physical Full-duplex only (no CSMA/CD!) NRZ line coding method 64b/66b Block coding method Generally optical (some limited electrical deployment) 231
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40GE and 100GE Physical layer standards Physical Layer Standard Description 40GBASE-SR4 40 Gb/s PHY over four lanes of multimode fiber, with reach up to at least 100 m 40GBASE-LR4 40 Gb/s PHY over four WDM lanes on single-mode fiber, with reach up to at least 10 km 100GBASE-SR10 100 Gb/s PHY using 100GBASE-R encoding over ten lanes of multimode fiber, with reach up to at least 100 m 100GBASE-LR4 100 Gb/s PHY using 100GBASE-R encoding over four WDM lanes on single-mode fiber, with reach up to at least 10 km 100GBASE-ER4 100 Gb/s PHY using 100GBASE-R encoding over four WDM lanes on single-mode fiber, with reach up to at least 40 km 232
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TDC-460 Foundations of Network Technologies Class 4 233
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Class 4 Topics 802.3 Ethernet MAC operation MAC deployment evolution CSMA/CD operation in a collision domain CSMA/CD operation in a point to point switched network Ethernet Flow Control 802.3x Pause Frame flow control 802.1Qbb Priority based Flow Control Ethernet Auto-negotiation
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Class 4 Topics 802.3 Ethernet MAC operation MAC deployment evolution CSMA/CD operation in a collision domain CSMA/CD operation in a point to point switched network Ethernet Flow Control 802.3x Pause Frame flow control 802.1Qbb Priority based Flow Control Ethernet Auto-negotiation
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Media Access Control Overview Recall If a link is a broadcast based link (aka multi-point link), then a MAC sub-layer is required to manage access to that link
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