Employ empowerment typically boosts the effectiveness

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teams, special­purpose teams, and self­managed teams. Employeeempowerment typically boosts the effectiveness of the teams.
Krajewski, L., Malhorta, M. & Ritzman, L. (2016).Operations Management: Processesand Supply Chains, Eleventh Edition. Pearson Education, New York, NY.Jenna BuettnerThread:Question 13 ­ Jenna BuettnerPost:RE: Question 13 ­ Jenna BuettnerAuthor:Posted Date:January 8, 2016 6:01 PMStatus:PublishedJenna,I thought you did a great job explaining the need for employee empowermentwithin an organization. I like the textbook’s definition of empowerment: “Anapproach to teamwork that moves responsibility for decisions further down theorganizational chart – to the level of the employee actually doing the job”(Krajewski, Malhotra, & Ritzman, 2015, p. 100). This benefit of usingJana McLendon
2/21/2016Collection – MBA675­T303 Operations & Logistics in the (...(Post is Read)empowerment within quality management is critical to process improvements.Many times processes are established when an employee begins in a positionwith a company. The employee learns the process and how the process fitswithin the greater organization. At some point the employee may see betterways of completing the process, and in encouraging an environment ofempowerment, process improvement occurs naturally. At my company, not onlyis empowerment one of our stated values and behaviors within the culture, butit is also encouraged by leaders and teams to stay up­to­date and competitive asa company.Jenna,I'm a huge fan of empowering your employees. and have always given mysubordinates the ability to control their own destiny by letting them takeownership of their programs and responsibilities. I wanted them to feel likethey were part of the solution, and hear their ideas, because they were the onesworking the day­to­day issues. Most of the time, they produced more, becausethey felt like they were making a difference.In my own experience, micromanagement causes quality problems, becauseyour subordinates don't feel valued, and they start doing just enough to get by.Low morale is bad for business, and employers should take it seriously, becauseit can affect the bottom line if your employees are not properly engaged anddoing good work.An article I read said low morale is "costing the American economy as much as$350 billion dollars per year in lost productivity including absenteeism, illness,and other problems that result when employees are unhappy at work" (Fink,2014). That's a tremendous amount of lost revenue for everyone involved, andemployers need to make sure their management/leadership is involved and apart of the solution.
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JanaReference:Krajewski, L. J., Malhotra, M. K., & Ritzman, L. P. (2015). OperationsManagement: Processes and Supply Chains (11 ed.). Boston, MA: Pearson.Thread:Question 13 ­ Jenna BuettnerPost:RE: Question 13 ­ Jenna BuettnerAuthor:Posted Date:January 9, 2016 5:30 PMStatus:Published

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