Prevented them from living normal and comfortable

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prevented them from living normal and comfortable lives 6 . Dr. King’s address encouraged President Kennedy to “take affirmative action to ensure that applicants are employed and that employees are treated during employment without regard to their race, creed, color, or national origin” 6 . This action was recognized as Executive Order 10925. This order established the arrangement of the President’s Committee on Equal Employment Opportunity (PCEEO) 6 . Their job was to ensure that equal opportunities were given to all U.S. citizens in the workforce. The passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 was overseen by PCEEO and the 88 th United States Congress. According to Davies, the Act was warranted as a “milestone for African Americans, outlawing discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, or national origin nationwide” 6 . Dr. King and other members of the Civil Rights Movement were finally beginning to see some major changes take place. Over the next few years, there were a few more executive orders passed that closed the loopholes found in the first order. Executive Order 11246 was signed by President Johnson on September 28, 1965 6 . This Order set requirements for nondiscriminatory practices in hiring employees. The formation of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission oversaw the federal enactment of these Orders and ensured that progress was in-fact being made. Housing Changes Though progress was being made, situations were far from perfect or ideal for African Americans. Dr. King and the SCLC still felt that there was much work to be done. They continued pressing on with their fight for justice and equality. The African American youth backed Dr. King now more than ever. Organizations such as the NAACP Youth Council and the
Monroe SCLC followers grew astronomically. From the mid-1950s to the early 1960s, student protests and sit-ins carried on and the backlash of white supremacist did not let up. After the integration of public facilities was passed, Dr. King continued on with the next issue that needed to be addressed. The housing options for African Americans were well below the standard of living. While many Whites fled the cities to live in more rural areas, African Americans were just getting job opportunities and could not afford to make the same fleet attempts. The inner city homes where blacks were forced to stay were run down and lacked any care for upkeep from the government. Executive Order 11063 was a step in the right direction when it came to the housing situation of African Americans. President Kennedy signed the Order on November 20, 1962. The order prohibited discrimination in the “sale, leasing, rental…of properties and facilities owned… by the federal government” 7 . This increased the opportunities for assistance given to African Americans and helped many get on their feet and into a decent place. It was not until the Fair Housing Act passed in 1968 when the African American communities truly began to see drastic changes with their housing arrangements. Many of the black families had begun to establish

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