So over time the oled displays color balance gets

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addition, the blue LEDs have a reputation for losing their luminescence faster than the red and the green OLEDs. So over time, the OLED display's color balance gets skewed with the loss of blue. Plasma Display 9:21-10:45 Now the next type of display device we're going to look at is called a plasma display. Now plasma displays function quite a bit differently than LCDs or OLEDs. Instead of using liquid crystals, plasma displays use small cells that are coated with phosphors and contain ionized gases. Now these cells are sandwiched between two electrode panels, and two glass panels. When an electrical current runs between one of these cells, a plasma is created inside and this causes a photon of light to be emitted.The photon then reacts with the cell's phosphor coating and depending on upon the material used in the coating, it'll be emitted as either red, green, or blue light. Now, because the gas itself is creating the light, plasma displays don't actually require backlighting.This allows them to have a high contrast ratio and also display true black very, very well. In addition, this reaction that you see here happens very, very fast, resulting in faster response times than LCDs.However, plasma displays also have several key weaknesses. First of all, plasma displays do consume a lot of power. Much more power than say, an LCD monitor will. In fact, some of them use two to three times more energy than LCD monitors do, and because of the manufacturing cost involved in making a plasma display, they're usually very large. You usually don't see small plasma displays made. Projector 10:46-12:18 Now, before we end, there's one last type of display device that we need to look at. And that's a projector. A projector is a device that's able to project an image onto a surface using light. The surface is usually a specialized screen made of some type of reflective material but almost any type of flat white surface can be used. Now projectors are composed of three main components: a lens, a powerful light source, which is typically an LED or a laser diode, and then a device that controls the light. Now there are two main types of projectors and both of which use different types of devices to control the light. The first type is an LCD projector. And as its name implies, an LCD projector uses an LCD screen to project images. In this type of projector, the light shines through an LCD screen. The screen polarizes the light and then controls its flow through red, green, or blue filters. The light is then refracted by the lens and projected onto the surface. The second type of projector is called a DLP projector. Now DLP stands for digital light processing. That's a totally different type of technology. With these types of projectors, light travels through a spinning color wheel to create red, green, and blue light. This light then hits the DMD, which is a small chip that is composed of millions of tiny mirrors and these mirrors either reflect light through the lens or onto a surface inside the projector that just absorbs the light. Now DLP projectors are a lot more expensive than LCD projectors, but they're able to produce much higher resolution images with better color accuracy.
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  • Spring '14
  • Liquid crystal display, Universal Serial Bus, Cathode Ray Tube

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