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Fusiform face area varies from person to person

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fusiform face area varies from person to person, resulting in differences in the ability to put names to faces and properly interpret emotions through facial expressions. This relation demonstrates that regardless of the acuteness of one’s ocular vision, without the smooth communication of particular areas of the brain, visual information has no meaning.Although the dorsal path and the ventrolateral path are significant in how the brain organizes the visual information from our eyes, the number of connections, layovers, and final destinations the neurons take from the visual cortex are vast and complicated. Sensory information is valuable for almost all parts of the brain, and is therefore shared throughout several different regions. Given this complexity, it is not surprising that occasionally, this information may be interfered with or be distorted in ways that produce sensory experiences that do not align with an external stimulus. These internally stimulated sensory experiences are known as hallucinations, and there are a number of different ways they are experienced and waysthey are caused. 7
Alterations to Visual PerceptionPerhaps the most common and expected source of a hallucination is a class of drugs known fittingly as hallucinogens. These include drugs such as LSD, psilocybin which is often found in mushrooms, and PCP. Hallucinogens are drugs that, when ingested, induce an altered state of consciousness as well as a number of different visual and additional sensory hallucinations. The power of the hallucinogen comes from its molecular structure. Drugs that affect brain function generally share a similar structure to a neurotransmitter, which are the chemicals responsible for causing neurons to behave in different ways (Wenk, 2010, 3). Hallucinogens all have a common structure known as an indole ring which they share with the neurotransmitter serotonin (Wenk, 2010, 84). Serotonin is responsible for a variety of brain functions and is involved in moods, sleep patterns, and dreaming. When a person enters the dream state of sleep, REM sleep, the serotonin-producing neurons in his brain are turned off completely. Although it is not known exactly how the absence of serotonin induces dreaming, it is believed that this neurotransmitter is responsible for the visions generally referred to as dreams(Wenk, 2010, 84).It may seem contradictory for a hallucinogen to cause dream like visions when it resembles serotonin, and it is the absence of serotonin that causes the dreaming state of sleep. Hallucinogens actually act to stop the production of serotonin by serotonergic neurons by stimulating 5HT1-A auto-receptors on the serotonergic neurons. These auto-receptors are meant to be activated when there is a surplus of serotonin in the synapse in order to stop the presynapticneuron from releasing more serotonin. When LSD is present in the brain, it stimulates these receptors, stopping production of serotonin and creating an environment in which hallucinations may be experienced (Wenk, 2010, 84).

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