If you are above this amount dont need to pay self

This preview shows page 27 - 29 out of 55 pages.

If you are above this amount, don’t need to pay self-employment tax IRA: For 2014 and 2015, the maximum you can contribute to all of your traditionaland Roth IRAsis the smaller of:$5,500($6,500if you’re age 50 or older), oryour taxable compensation for the year.The IRA contribution limit does not apply to:RollovercontributionsQualified reservist repaymentsClaiming a tax deduction for your IRA contributionYour traditional IRA contributions may be tax-deductible. The deduction may be limited if you or your spouse is covered by a retirement plan at work and your income exceeds certain levels. If neither you nor your spouse is covered by a retirement plan at work, your deduction is allowed in full.401(k)s. The annual contribution limit for employees who participate in 401(k), 403(b), most 457 plans, and the federal government’s Thrift Savings Plan, is $18,000 for 2015, up from $17,500 in 2013 and 2014.The 401(k) Catch-Up. The catch-up contribution limit for employees age 50 or older in these plans goes up to $6,000 for 2015, up from $5,500. Even if you don’t turn 50 until Dec. 31, 2015, you can make the additional $6,000 catch-up contribution for the year.Roth IRAs
Roth IRA contributions aren’t deductible.Traditional IRAsRetirement plan at workYour deduction may be limited if you (or your spouse, if you are married) are covered by a retirement plan at work and your income exceeds certain levels.No retirement plan at workYour deduction is allowed in full if you (and your spouse, if you are married) aren’t covered by a retirement plan at work.In 2013, your IRA contribution limit is $5,500. However, because of your filing status and AGI, the limit on the amount you can deduct is $3,500. You can make a nondeductible contribution of $2,000 ($5,500 - $3,500). In an earlier year you received a $3,000 qualified reservist distribution, which you would like to repay this year.   For 2013, you can contribute a total of $8,500 to your IRA. This is made up of the maximum deductible contribution of $3,500; a nondeductible contribution of $2,000; and a $3,000 qualified reservist repayment. You contribute the maximum allowable for the year. Since you are making a nondeductible contribution ($2,000) and a qualified reservist repayment ($3,000), you must file Form 8606 with your return and include $5,000 ($2,000 + $3,000) on line 1 of Form 8606. The qualified reservist repayment is not deduct1.Danny, an unmarried college student working part-time, earns $3,500 in 2014. Danny can contribute $3,500, the amount of his compensation, to his IRA for 2014. Danny’s grandmother canmake the contribution on his behalf.2.John, 42, has both a traditional IRA and a Roth IRA and can only contribute a total of $5,500 to either one or both in 2014.3.Sarah, age 52, is married with no taxable compensation for 2014. She and her husband reported taxable compensation of $60,000 on their 2014 joint return. Sarah may contribute $6,500 to her IRA for 2014 ($5,500 plus an additional $1,000 contribution for age 50 and over).Moving Expenses: If you moved due to a change in your job or business location, or because you started

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture