In stating You seem to be experiencing postpartum depression I sugges that you

In stating you seem to be experiencing postpartum

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reassurance. In stating, “You seem to be experiencing postpartum depression. I suggest that you have someone take your baby for a while until your hormones level off,” the nurse nontherapeutically intellectualizes and makes a premature diagnosis. Test-Taking Strategy: Use your knowledge of therapeutic communication techniques. This will direct you to the correct option because it is the one that encourages the client to express her feelings. Review: therapeutic communication techniques . Reference: Stuart, G. (2009). Principles & practice of psychiatric nursing (9th ed., pp. 27-31, 225, 226). St. Louis: Mosby. Cognitive Ability: Applying
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Client Needs: Psychosocial Integrity Integrated Process: Communication and Documentation Content Area: Mental Health Giddens Concepts: Mood and Affect, Reproduction HESI Concepts: Mood and Affect, Sexuality/Reproduction Awarded 1.0 points out of 1.0 possible points. 82.ID: 9477084340 A client with an alcohol problem who has been sober for 8 months asks the nurse, “Do you think I should add individual therapy to my treatment plan?” Which response by the nurse would be therapeutic? · “What do you think? What is the individual therapy all about?” · “Are you feeling that you’re vulnerable to a slip? If not, why complicate treatment further?” · “The best time to add individual therapy seems to be after 2 to 5 years of sobriety. Individuals vary, though, and it may be that you are asking because you feel ready to work on your issues.” Correct · “Okay, what’s going on with you? You had to be coerced into treatment, but now you seem to want the full monty.” Rationale: The appropriate response is the one that provides information to the client about individual therapy. In asking, “What do you think? What is the individual therapy all about?” the nurse makes a sincere query without doubting and probing but does not provide any information to the client, which is not helpful. In asking, “Are you feeling like you are still very vulnerable to a slip? If not, why complicate treatment further?” the nurse is challenging the client. In asking, “Okay, what’s going on with you? You had to be coerced into treatment, but now you seem to want the full monty,” the nurse questions and is aggressive to the client, using an accusatory style of expressing doubt. Test-Taking Strategy: Use your knowledge of therapeutic communication techniques and knowledge regarding the effectiveness of individual therapy. The correct option is the only therapeutic response and the one that provides accurate information to the client. Review: therapeutic communication techniques and the effects of individual therapy . References: Stuart, G. (2009). Principles & practice of psychiatric nursing (9th ed., pp. 27-31). St. Louis: Mosby. Varcarolis, E., & Halter, M. (2009). Essentials of psychiatric mental health nursing: A communication approach to evidence-based care (p. 354). St. Louis: Saunders.
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