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Most of public has little knowledge of wildlife and

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Most of public has little knowledge of wildlife and are eager for informationKnowing behavior traits ensures correct information is givenoAlso important to know local regulations and restrictions when it comes to species of concernHelping public find solutions prevents relocating animal needlessly and saves the rehabilitator fromhaving to care for the animalOn the phone be calm and friendly to put the caller at ease and be understanding and sympathetic toincrease callers willingness to answer important questionsoCallers may be worried about judgement or repercussions or angry and frustrated and less likelyto disclose detailsImportant Questions to AskHave a list of questions or checklist available during phone calls so nothing is missedImportant to get as much information as possible during first phone call to make admission decisionsFirst, determine species and age of animaloOften callers misidentify, if description is confusing ask for a call or text with a photo of theanimal – key to identificationWhereoWhere was the animal found? Can tell you how injury was sustainedE.g. open field, woodland, roadway, down chimney, near power lines, etc.WhenoWhen was the animal found or first observed? Can tell you how long animal needed helpWhatoWhat were the circumstances under which the animal was found?E.g. recent weather events, habitat destruction, cat brought it into houseWas an obvious injury observed? Liming, bleeding, wing droop?Has the finder provided any care? Food or water? Medical care? First aid? Taken to veterinarian?oOften animals fed improper diets and given medicines by finderWhen to AdmitTrue orphanBleedingShivering when not weather-appropriate, cold to touchLethargicFound with maggots or flies
BIOL*3670Had contact with dog or catUnresponsiveApproachable – healthy adult wild animals are usually notExceptionsComing out of hibernation – appear sleepy and disorientedNaïve juveniles – very young animals haven’t learned what to fear and appear friendlyNatural defense mechanisms (freezing) – normal response for many speciesReptiles and amphibians and some marsupials may not feel warmWhen to leave along or return to nestOn first observation of a wandering young animal, determine the following:oLegs/wings are symmetricaloVocalizing is normaloAppears bright and healthyoNest is nearby (can be well hidden)oParents seen in area or heard vocalizingIf found to be healthy, place a neonate back into nest or den ASAPFor juvenile or sub-adult birds or mammalsoLegs/wings are symmetricaloVocalizing is normaloAppears bright and healthyoMobile – should be able to walk, hop, or fly a littleHealthy juveniles should be left alone or placed out of harm’s way, likely parents are nearbyInteractions with Wildlife and SafetySafety of humans is paramountIf caller is comfortable handling the animal, info on how to best handle it to ensure human safety first

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Term
Spring
Professor
NoProfessor
Tags
bear, cubs, The Grave,

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