5 The press secretary is responsible Saylor URL Saylororg

5 the press secretary is responsible saylor url

This preview shows page 569 - 572 out of 783 pages.

[5] The press secretary is “responsible
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Saylor URL: Saylor.org 570 for creating and disseminati ng the official record of the president’s statements, announcements, reactions, and explanations.” [6] The press secretary has three constituencies with different expectations of him: “the president, White House staff, reporters and their news organization s.” [7] Link White House Press Briefings Search the archives of press briefings at - room/press-briefings . In every presidency starting with Ronald Reagan’s, press secretaries begin their day with meetings with the central coordinator of policy and message, the White House chief of staff, and other senior staffers to study overnight news developments (a news summary is circulated each day to senior staff), forecast where stories are going, and review the president’s schedule. Press secretaries next prepare for their first interaction with reporters, the morning’s daily, less formal discussion known as the gaggle. [8] Cameras are not allowed into the gaggle. Reporters use tape recorders only to gather information, not for sound bites. The press secretary begins the gaggle by reviewing the president’s schedule before entering into a fast-moving question-and-answer session. The gaggle benefits reporters: it provides responses to overnight news, gives guidance for the workday ahead, reveals the line the White House is pushing and allows them to lobby for access to the president. The gaggle helps press secretaries too by enabling them to float ideas and slogans and, by hearing what’s on reporters’ minds, prepare for the afternoon briefing. The press secretary leads this more official 12:30 p.m. briefing, which is as close as anything to a daily enunciation of White House policy. Here, cameras are allowed; the briefing is broadcast live on cable television if news is brewing. The session is transcribed and disseminated (electronically and on paper) to reporters at the White House and beyond. The press secretary spends the hours between the gaggle and the briefing looking for answers to questions raised (or anticipated) and checking with other
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Saylor URL: Saylor.org 571 spokespersons elsewhere in the administration, such as at the Departments of State and Defense. Figure 13.6 The daily White House press briefing is a central event of the day for both reporters and press secretaries. Source: Photo courtesy of the White House (Tina Hager), - whitehouse.archives.gov/history/photoessays/pressbriefingroom/02-js.html . Briefings do not always benefit the White House. The presence of television cameras sometimes pushes reporters to be or act tough and combative for viewers. Reporters try to throw the press secretary off balance or to elicit a juicy or embarrassing admission. Briefings offer reporters a rare chance to quiz officials on matters the White House would prefer not to discuss. Press secretaries are often unresponsive to r eporters’ questions, stonewall, and repeat set phrases. During a single briefing when he was
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