On time delivery o number of items ordered and

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On-time delivery o Number of items ordered and delivered Date of delivery o Delivery “windows” up to 2 days early, and 1 day late okayed at point of purchase o Are you only “on time” if you hit the actual date?
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Spreadsheet columns of data with: Request Date, Original Promise Date, Delivery Date, Dock Date, Ship Date, Revised Promise Date, and Actual Ship Date. Common metrics associated with order processing and delivery time: on-time shipments (usually in a percentage), internal order cycle time, lines picked and shipped per hour, total order cycle time, lines received and put away per hour, dock to stock cycle time, on-time ready to ship (usually in percentage). When companies are habitually late customers begin to lower expectations, this is called “sub-optimized supply chains.” Can lead to entities along the chain all “padding” their expected due dates leading to lag and waste at all points along the chain. Delivery modes: Trucks, planes, and drones... Presenting Data: Make your main point early on Create a title of your report or presentation that indicates your main point Auxiliary points should support main point Context- Put your information Historical Data Zeitgeist or Trends External Factors Internal Factors Anticipating questions: Do your best to address problematic concerns early. Think about what questions arise from your main point. Summarizing and Conclusions : Tell your story again briefly Take-home message State the insight and next steps Do’s and don’ts of text content: Keep it simple. Watch spelling and grammar. Make sure your adjectives and adverbs are placed carefully. Do not split verbs. Watch your noun-verb agreement. Data “are,” datum “is.” Limit text – “talk your talk.” Sometimes a picture is worth a thousand words. Do’s and don’ts of visualizations: Clearly label graphs. Do not “pump up” graphed results with zoomed-in axis ranges. Use grey-scale and color for emphasis. Do not repeat title in graph and on slide. Highlight main features to draw attention to those things that are important. Limit dimensions to three maximum per graph.
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Limit the number of graphs you present to the essentials. Tables are useful when comparing multiple statistics. Do’s and don’ts of look and feel: Number your slides. Use animations sparingly. No flips, blinks, or rotations! Limit color use. Mellowed tone and one accent color used for emphasis. Try to maintain same font size for text throughout. Decide on a font and stay with it. Have handouts for your audience.
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  • Spring '18
  • Danny Weathers
  • new product development, researcher, Operationalization Concretization

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