Christopher b leinberger the option of urbanism if it

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— Christopher B. Leinberger, The Option of Urbanism
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If it looks comfortable, people will sit there. Let them. Dimension and glaze openings so that one can see or imagine someone else looking back. D E S I G N R E V I E W D I S T R I C T S T a l l a h a s s e e - L e o n C o u n t y P l a n n i n g D e p a r t m e n t G A I N E S S T R E E T ±¶ P R I N C I P L E S U R BA N D E S I G N 2. 2.d. Build to Human Scale PRINCIPLE H uman scale is the proportional relationship of design elements to human dimensions, presence, and movement. Like a scale figure in a drawing, seeing other people in context lets us quickly size up the scale of a building or place, and gauge our comfort level. Buildings and spaces scaled to human movement have steps, doorways, windows, railings, and walking distances that fit well to the average person, while welcoming the differently-abled. Seen at a distance across plenty of parking, buildings built to the scale of the automobile are smooth and two-dimensional, readable at a glance, with little indication of interior space. Drivers are keeping up with traffic, and seek a predictable big logo or familiar building shape. Signs have big letters and few words. In contrast, human-scaled places invite pedestrians to walk at their own pace, to look at shop windows or deep into a store, to stop for a conversation or to read a menu. There are places to stand and people to watch, and cars are parked at the curb. At the sidewalk level, human-scaled buildings are complex with texture, color, shadow, and surprise, while massing and upper-floor fenestration indicate the dimensions and presence of other people. GUIDELINES Design buildings at a variety of scales, with street level detail appropriate to a pedestrian’s walking pace. Clearly articulate different uses at lower building levels to create a sense of human scale at the street in mid-rise and taller buildings. Avoid monolithic, vertical extrusions of maximum building footprints. Use architectural elements and details that walkers can enjoy in ways that drivers can’t. Invite pedestrians to slow down with big, clear, well-merchandised storefront windows, lighted in the evening. Modern building materials do not preclude designing to human scale. Provide street furniture designed first for human comfort, for walkers to rest, have a conversation, or wait for the bus. What attracts people most, it would appear, is other people. —William H. Whyte, author, The Social Life of Small Urban Spaces
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New Orleans San Francisco no Langley VA no Minnesota no Calhoun Street, Tallahassee no ±· U R B A N D E S I G N G U I D E L I N E S P R I N C I P L E S U R BA N D E S I G N 2. A window you can’t see into or out of is not designed to human scale.
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