This has taught the creature that it can be its own being in a way and that it

This has taught the creature that it can be its own

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wants to do it. This has taught the creature that it can be its own ‘being’ in a way, and that it does not have to abide by the rules of humanity, because it is a product of nature. Whenever the general mood of the novel changes, so do the nature scenes. Nature has taught the monster that it is okay to break the rules, and had helped Shelley to develop her theme of the monster in everyone. Characterizing Victor Frankenstein helps the reader to better understand the theme of the monster in everyone. Victor’s personality is one that nobody would miss because it is very unpleasant. Chris Bond characterizes Victor in a perfect way. He says, “First, there is unrepentant, energetic egotism of a creator, and a creation who could have been welcomed if he had met the physical room, particularly given his apparent intelligence and awareness” (Bond 4). If Victor had out just a little bit of thought and consideration in to the way that the creature looked or was raised, the events that took place would not have had as high of a chance of occurring as they did. The creature felt alone, mostly because his ‘father’ (or creator) abandoned
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Desaulniers 3 him at birth. As Colleen Bentley writes in her critical essay, “Suspecting that Frankenstein cannot be entrusted to fulfill his role as a loving parent, the creature applies to a more abstract idea of obligation to solicit his attention” (Bentley 12). The final appearance and personality of the creature was not entirely Victor’s fault, but he played a huge role in causing a lot of it to turn out the way it did. Later, Victor is portrayed as weak and emotional. The novel states, “…often, I say, I was tempted to plunge into silent lake, that the water might close over me and my calamities forever” (Shelley 62). Even if it was just himself, it is perfectly noticeable that Victor can kill, that he has it inside him, no matter how hard he tries to hide it. Victor Frankenstein has a monster inside him that later became even more noticeable than before. The characterization of the creature is very different from that of the creator, Victor Frankenstein, which was no accident. The creature only wants what it was never given. George V. Griffith, a British novelist, write in his essay, “Childlike in his innocence, the monster wants only to be loved, but he gets love from neither his father nor from any other in the human community” (Griffith 2). After being abandoned by Victor, the creature was left to learn about the world on its own, which can be a very dangerous thing. The creature eventually finds a group of cottagers that he likes, so he hides in the mountains and watches these people and learns from them. As Peter Brooks says in his essay, “At its completion, the monster’s narrative implies that use of language has failed to gain him entry into the ‘chain of existence and events,’ but has rather made him fully aware of his unique and accursed origin” (Brooks 3). The creature had no idea where he had come from, and was very confused about everything else as well. As the creature educated himself by watching the cottagers, it began to understand a lot more about where it came from and why and how it was alive. Not only did it begin to realize where it came from, but it also began to understand the concept of love and parenthood, two things that he should have learned as soon as he was created, but instead had to learn of them by a means other
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