Because abdominal pain can be refereed from other areas the provider should

Because abdominal pain can be refereed from other

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Because abdominal pain can be refereed from other areas, the provider should also examine the lungs, heart, head and neck, and musculoskeletal system (Dains, et al, 2016). Is the Current Diagnosis Acceptable? The current diagnosis is unacceptable without further assessment and testing. While gastroenteritis can be diagnosed via subjective and objective assessment data only (Dains, Bauman, Scheibel, 2015), the advanced practice nurse must rule out any other possible
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NURS 6512 Week 6 Assignment 4 diagnosis. Usually patients with gastroenteritis have a diffuse, crampy abdominal pain accompanied by nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and fever. The patient is afebrile with nausea and diarrhea, but has not informed the provider of any vomiting. According to Dains, et al, the patient with gastroenteritis will have hyperactive bowel sounds, which our patient does have. Gastroenteritis usually resolves without any treatment and requires no diagnostic testing. Conditions That Could Be Considered a Different Diagnosis The patient could be experiencing a number of abdominal issues. The patient has complained of diffuse abdominal pain with nausea and has hyperactive bowel sounds. These vague symptoms can also point to ureterolithiasis, bowel obstruction, or irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Each condition requires specific diagnostic testing in order to form an accurate diagnosis. 1) Ureterolithiasis occurs when kidney stones form in the ureters. The patient reports the sudden onset of excruciating intermittent colicky pain that can progress to a constant pain (Dains, et al, 2016). The pain is in the lower abdomen and flank and radiates to the groin. The patient with ureterolithiasis may also have nausea, vomiting, abdominal distention, chills, and fever (Dains, et al, 2016). Hematuria and urinary frequency can also be present. A urinalysis can be done to determine urine pH and the presence of crystals can help identify stone composition. A definitive diagnosis is made via noncontrast-enhanced helical computed tomography (CT) scan.
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  • Summer '15
  • Week 6 Assignment

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