The key players in this initiative are the company president and the five

The key players in this initiative are the company

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The key players in this initiative are the company president and the five members of the OD Group. Peripheral members of this initiative are the company’s spate of vice presidents and other senior managers. The OD Group was initially charged with the ambiguous mission of improving the company. They did this through a series of training programs based on the managerial style of various areas of the company. They ran into a series of issues, both within the OD Group and with other leaders in the company. Eventually, their program came under scrutiny for the amount of money they were spending and the perceived lack of oversight of their program. Although not completely settled, the group’s future does not seem to be very bright as infighting amongst group members and conflicts with certain sections of senior management have seemed to derail their once promising progress. One of the biggest barriers to effective change can be found in the attitude of those who will have to live with the change. Brown (2011) states that “the failure of management to win acceptance of the proposed changes…”(p. 152) is one of the biggest reasons that change initiatives fail. In Hexidecimal’s case, many senior managers did not see the reason that the OD Group existed. The company had been very successful and had adopted an ‘if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it’ mentality. The OD Group might have been more successful if they had actively courted senior managers into their OD plans. By thinking and considering the needs of these senior managers, they may have “… reduce[d] resistance, and obtain[ed] commitment…” (Alasadi & Askary, 2014, p. 41) for their new ideas. The lack of a concrete set of goals from the company’s president also factored into the OD Groups limited success. Experts in the fields of change management and organizational development have stated that an ambiguity of goals, among other inconsistencies, can ruin a change program before it even gets moving (Muo, 2014). If the company’s president had charged the group with a specific goal or targeted improvement, they might have encountered less resistance from certain areas of the management team. On the smaller scale, the group itself seemed to begin as a highly motivated group of individuals and after a period of time devolved into disparate personalities with different ideas on how to enact change in the company. Successful OD programs require the effort of a “…coordinated team effort…” (Perkov, Perkov, & Papic, 2014, p. 1079). The OD Group did not always see eye to eye on how to approach their change initiatives, with some favoring direct confrontation and others
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supporting more gradual, analytical approaches. Without a unified approach from the OD Group, they cannot effectively overcome the personal barriers to change found in the company. If the OD Group cannot deal with one another in a cohesive way, they cannot hope to overcome the emotional barriers that come with almost any change management effort in an established company or environment (Bringselius, 2014).
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