We will discuss some examples of the applications and demonstrate the technique

We will discuss some examples of the applications and

This preview shows page 38 - 42 out of 57 pages.

with phase-enhanced images in a variety of samples at different x-ray energies. We will discuss some examples of the applications and demonstrate the technique with x-ray movies of living insects taken at video rates, and x-ray movies of fuel injectors taken with micro-second exposures. The Advanced Photon Source is supported by the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract No. W-31-109-Eng-38. C-5
Image of page 38
D1. Recent Advances in Synchrotron X-ray Optics and Applications Qun Shen CHESS, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853. I will present an overview of several advances in recent years in the area of synchrotron x-ray optics and their applications with regards to protein crystallography and biological imaging. These advances include high-resolution and wide-bandpass multilayers for high-flux and Laue data collection, focusing optics for micro-crystallography and imaging, and high-energy- resolution optics for resonant and inelastic scattering experiments. Experimental examples will be given to illustrate the advantages of these new developments, with an outlook towards future applications.
Image of page 39
D-1
Image of page 40
D2. Optimizing Monocapillary Optics for Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction, Fluorescence Imaging, and Spectroscopy Applications. Donald H. Bilderback 281 Wilson Laboratory, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14850 A number of synchrotron x-ray applications (powder diffraction in diamond anvil cells, microbeam protein crystallography, x-ray fluorescence imaging, etc.) can benefit from using hollow glass monocapillary optics to improve the experimental conditions. These in-line optics are easy to add to existing beamlines and can be aligned quite simply in a few minutes of time. Our capillary optics group at CHESS has been successfully pioneering these methods for a number of years. I’ll give an overview of the state of the art in our capillary making and discuss the good agreement between simulation and actual practice. A simple Matlab program is now available to plug in source size, distance from source to optics, maximum divergence allowed and working distance (distance from the capillary tip to the focus), and the expected errors from fabrication. We currently draw glass tubing into the desired elliptical shape so that only one-bounce under total reflection conditions is needed to bring the x-ray beam to a focus. We have been able to achieve figure errors of 1 to 2 microns and slope errors of 60 to 140 microradians. This is not bad for freely drawn glass and we are in the process of making the third generation puller to try to do even better. So for modest focal spot sizes of 10 to 20 microns, we can increase the intensity per square micron by factors of 10 to 1000, depending on the divergence allowed with working lengths beyond the tip of capillary of typically from 25 to 50 mm (for diamond cells).
Image of page 41
Image of page 42

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 57 pages?

  • Spring '19
  • X-ray crystallography, Neutron diffraction

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture