Sociologists explain adherence to religion in terms

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Sociologists explain adherence to religion in terms of social, not psychological, personal  or spiritual factors. Religious Organizations Institutionalized Church Denomination Less institutionalized Sect
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Cult These terms developed for the Christian world, only imperfectly capture other religions  How do organized religions develop? (one theory) 1) religious movements coalesce around charismatic leaders 2) the “routinization of charism” “New religious movements” may develop out of established religions  World affirming movements work within the outside world’s values/norms Self-help, new age movement, etc may fit in here World rejecting movements reject values/norms of the outside world Some cults work like “total institutions” World accommodating movements emphasize the inner life over the outside world. Religion in America Long term, affiliation with an organized church has become more common Conservative denominations of Christianity have been growing since the 1960s, liberal  and moderate denominations have declined Number of Catholics has grown, driven largely by immigration Number of Jews has declined steadily (but with some recent revivals)  Does religious pluralism increase or decrease religiosity? Religious pluralism alone doesn’t seem to cause greater religiosity However, pluralism may lead to increased religiosity under certain circumstances “religious markets”—when churches compete, “niche” religions develop that can lead to  high levels of participation/belief
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