Organizational rewards are also powerful systems that refreeze behaviors45 If

Organizational rewards are also powerful systems that

This preview shows page 55 - 62 out of 63 pages.

structure and situational conditions. Organizational rewards are also powerful systems that refreeze behaviors.45 If the change process is supposed to encourage efficiency, then rewards should be realigned to motivate and reinforce efficient behavior. Information systems play a complementary role in the change process, particularly as conduits for feedback.46 Feedback mechanisms help employees learn how well they are moving toward the desired objectives, and they provide a permanent architecture to support the new behavior patterns in the long term. The adage, "What gets measured, gets done," applies here. Employees concentrate on the new priorities when they receive a continuous flow of feedback
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about how well they are achieving those goals. Bank of New Zealand BNZ applied this refreezing strategy by changing the feedback and reward system at its call centers. Previously, call center employees received feedback and were rewarded for answering and completing calls quickly. However, management concluded that customers wanted efficient calls, not fast talkers. "What do fast calls have to do with great conversations?" asks Susan Basile, BNZ's managing director of direct sales and service. "Sure, we don't want to waste the customer's time. But if we were to ask them what they most wanted from our call center, they might well say they want fast answers, but we'd be wrong to conclude they want fast talkers or hurried conversations." Now, BNZ provides employee feedback and rewards around "great conversations," not how quickly the call is completed. Employees are recognized for addressing customer needs rather than for how long it takes them to complete the call.47 Rituals and I connections 14.1
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47% 43% Mina Ishiwatari (center) faced, and overcame, resistance to change in the company that her grandfather founded.
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EXHIBIT 15.2 Strategies for Minimizing Resistance to Change STRATEGY EXAMPLE WHEN APPLIED PROBLEMS Communication
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Customer complaint letters are shown to employees. When employees don't feel an urgency for change, don't know how the change will affect them, or resist change due to a fear of the unknown. Time-consuming and potentially costly. Learning Employees learn how to work in teams as company adopts a team-based structure. When employees need to break old routines and adopt new role patterns. Time consuming, potentially costly, and some employees might be unable to learn the new skills.
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Employee involvement Company forms a task force to recommend new customer service practices. When the change effort needs more employee commitment, some em ployees need to save face, and/or employee ideas would improve deci sions about the change strategy. Very time-consuming. Might lead to conflict and poor deci sions if employees' interests are incompatible with organi zational needs. Stress
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management Employees attend sessions to discuss their worries about the change. When communication, training, and involvement do not sufficiently ease employee worries.
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