Plants take up water from the soil and release large

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An Introduction to Physical Science
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Chapter 23 / Exercise 14
An Introduction to Physical Science
Shipman/Wilson
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a role in the water cycle. Plants take up water from the soil and release large amounts of water vapor into the air through their leaves, a process known as transpiration. NASAhas an excellent online guideof the hydrologic cycle.People also depend on water as a natural resource. Not content to get water directly from streams or ponds, humans create canals, aqueducts, dams, and wells to collect water and direct it to where they want it.USEUNITED STATESGLOBAL
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An Introduction to Physical Science
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Chapter 23 / Exercise 14
An Introduction to Physical Science
Shipman/Wilson
Expert Verified
AgricultureDomestic (drinking, bathing)IndustryPower plant cooling34 percent12 percent5 percent49 percent70 percent10 percent20 percentsmallThe table above displays water use in the United States and globally (Estimated Use of Water in the United States in 2005, USGS). It is important to note that water molecules cycle around. If climate cools and glaciers and ice caps grow, there is less water for the oceans and sea level will fall. The reverse can also happen.Streams and RiversFresh water in streams, ponds, and lakes is an extremely important part of the water cycle if only because of its importance to living creatures. Along with wetlands, these fresh water regions contain a tremendous variety of organisms.Streamsare bodies of water that have a current; they are in constant motion. Geologists recognize many categories of streams depending on their size, depth, speed, and location. Creeks, brooks, tributaries, bayous, and rivers might all be lumped
together as streams. In streams, water always flows downhill, but the form that downhill movement takes varies with rock type, topography, and many other factors. Stream erosion and deposition are extremely important creators and destroyers of landforms and were described in the Erosion and Deposition chapter.Stream SourcePARTS OF A STREAMOddly enough, there are a variety of different typesstreams. A stream originates at its source. A sourceis likely to be in the high mountains where snows collect in winter and melt in summer, or a source might be a spring. A stream may have more than one sources and when two streams come together it’s called a confluence. The smaller of the two streams is a tributaryof the larger stream. A stream may create a pool where water slows and becomes deeper.The point at which a stream comes into a large body of water, like an ocean or a lake is called the mouth. Where the stream meets the oceanor lake is anestuary. The mix of fresh and salt water where a river runs into the ocean creates a diversity of environments where many different types of organisms create unique ecosystems.RIVERSRiversare the largest types of stream, moving large amounts of water from higher to lower elevations. The Amazon River, the world’s river with the greatest flow, has a flow rate of nearly 220,000 cubic meters per second! People have used rivers since the beginning of civilization as a source of water, food, transportation, defense, power, recreation, and waste disposal.
ConfluenceTributaryEstuaryDivides
A divideis a topographically high area that separates a landscape into different water basins. Rain that falls on the north side of a ridge flows into the northern drainage basin

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